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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention traced an ongoing E. coli outbreak to the Central Coastal region of California. If you're sure your lettuce was grown elsewhere, you can eat it. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket in California in April, during an E. coli outbreak traced to contaminated lettuce. The CDC says a new outbreak has made lettuce dangerous to eat, just in time for America's most foodcentric holiday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Chase Kulakowski, 3, contracted the polio-like condition known as acute flaccid myelitis in 2016. Two years later, his mother isn't sure he will ever recover. He's seen on his bed at home in Dyer, Ind., in October. Armando L. Sanchez/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Armando L. Sanchez/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images

Cases Of Mysterious Paralyzing Condition Continue To Increase, CDC Says

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Doctors have been tweeting about their experiences treating victims of gun violence after the NRA mocked a position paper by the American College of Physicians. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

After NRA Mocks Doctors, Physicians Reply: 'This Is Our Lane'

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"I am frustrated that despite all of our efforts, we haven't been able to identify the cause of this mystery illness," said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. James Leynse/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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James Leynse/Corbis/Getty Images

CDC Investigates Cases Of Rare Neurological 'Mystery Illness' In Kids

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Charlie Hinderliter got a bad case of the flu back in January. He spent 58 days in the hospital, underwent two surgeries and was in a medically induced coma for a week. Neeta Satam for NPR hide caption

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Neeta Satam for NPR

Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot

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A tinted transmission electron micrograph of Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria (light purple/black) inside a cell. Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 1.7 million reported cases in 2017. Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source hide caption

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Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source

Designer Kate Spade is pictured in April 2017 in New York City. Anthony Bourdain is pictured in April 2018 in New York City. Both died in the same week. Left: Andrew Toth/FilmMagic Right: Matthew Eisman/Getty Images hide caption

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Left: Andrew Toth/FilmMagic Right: Matthew Eisman/Getty Images

When Suicide Is 'Buzzing Around'

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

CDC: U.S. Suicide Rates Have Climbed Dramatically

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A pharmacist speaks with a customer at Walmart Neighborhood Market in Bentonville, Ark., in 2014. On Monday Walmart introduced a new set of guidelines for dispensing opioid medications. Sarah Bentham/AP hide caption

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Sarah Bentham/AP

A man shops for vegetables near romaine lettuce for sale at a supermarket in California, where the first death from the E. coli outbreak was reported. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Police said the body of CDC epidemiologist Timothy Cunningham was found along the banks of an Atlanta river seven weeks after he vanished. Foul play is not suspected, but questions remain unanswered. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hide caption

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention