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More than 30,000 people a year are killed by gun violence, including 50 killed near the Los Vegas strip last month where this makeshift memorial stands. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What If We Treated Gun Violence Like A Public Health Crisis?

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Sara Wong for NPR

For People With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, More Exercise Isn't Better

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In a new report, the CDC says U.S. doctors are prescribing fewer opioids than they were in 2010, but that overall rates remain high. Donald Gruener/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Donald Gruener/iStockphoto/Getty Images

Opioid Prescriptions Falling But Remain Too High, CDC Says

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The death rate for African-Americans dropped 25 percent over 17 years, but most of that was among people ages 65 and older. Dutchy/Getty Images hide caption

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Death Rate Among Black Americans Declines, Especially For Elderly People

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U.S. authorities are working on an emergency deal to import the yellow fever vaccine Stamaril, which is not currently licensed in the U.S. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Amianthus, a variety of asbestos. Exposure to the fibers can cause mesothelioma, a cancer of the thin membranes that line the chest and abdomen. DEA Picture Library/Getty Images/DeAgostini hide caption

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DEA Picture Library/Getty Images/DeAgostini

Puerto Rico resident Michelle Flandez caresses her two-month-old son Inti Perez, diagnosed with microcephaly linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the Zika virus continues to impact a small number of pregnant women and their babies in the U.S. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Under the old rules, the CDC's authority was primarily limited to detaining travelers entering the U.S. or crossing state lines. With the new rules, the CDC would be able to detain people anywhere in the country, without getting approval from state and local officials. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

CDC Seeks Controversial New Quarantine Powers To Stop Outbreaks

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Candida auris is a fungus that can cause invasive infections, is associated with high mortality and is often resistant to multiple antifungal drugs, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC hide caption

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CDC

A government worker sprays mosquito insecticide fog in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, earlier this month to block the spread of Zika. The U.S. CDC advises pregnant women to reconsider plans to travel to Malaysia and 10 other countries because of the virus. Joshua Paul/AP hide caption

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Joshua Paul/AP

Pregnant Women Should Consider Not Traveling To Southeast Asia

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