HIV HIV

A photo provided by the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania shows an Aetna mailer in which a reference to HIV medication is partly visible though the envelope window. AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania hide caption

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AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania

The Tataya Mato week at Jameson Camp in Indianapolis is a free sleep away camp for children impacted by HIV/AIDS. Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Between Swimming And Archery, This Camp Helps Kids Overcome The Stigma Of HIV/AIDS

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Indiana State Health Commissioner Dr. Jerome Adams is President Trump's nominee for U.S. Surgeon General. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

A patient is tested for malaria at a clinic in Kenya. U.S. funding for antimalarial efforts, HIV prevention and other programs abroad could be affected by the newly expanded "Mexico City policy." Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images

Opana ER was reformulated to make it harder to crush and snort, but people abusing the drug turned to injecting it instead. And that fueled an HIV outbreak in Indiana. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

A large collage decorates a wall of one exam room at the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic in San Francisco, Calif. Dr. David Smith, founder of the clinic, says patients and staff call the mural the Psychedelic Wall of Fame. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

A young woman is tested for HIV at a health clinic in Uganda. During the presidency of George W. Bush, the U.S. substantially ramped up spending on HIV/AIDS programs abroad — a commitment that retains strong bipartisan support to this day. Per-Anders Pettersson/Getty Images hide caption

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Per-Anders Pettersson/Getty Images

Trump Takes Office At A Pivotal Moment For Foreign Aid

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Men protesting in support of more money for AIDS research marched down Fifth Avenue during the 14th annual Lesbian and Gay Pride parade in New York in 1983. Mario Suriani/AP hide caption

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Mario Suriani/AP

Researchers Clear 'Patient Zero' From AIDS Origin Story

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Once-a-day HIV pills that combine multiple medicines, such as Truvada, are easier to take, but they can be more expensive than pills that contain only one active ingredient. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Woman holding the dapivirine vaginal ring. Andrew Loxley/International Partnership for Microbicides hide caption

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Andrew Loxley/International Partnership for Microbicides

The HIV Trap: A Woman's Lack Of Control

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Randy Curtis has hemophilia. These days he regularly injects the clotting factor treatments he needs from home, as a relatively easy way of preventing the episodes of catastrophic bleeding that plagued him as a child. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

Baby Boomers With Hemophilia Didn't Expect To Grow Old

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Cassandra Steptoe (center) rehearses a performance with fellow actresses as part of The Medea Project, in San Francisco. Steptoe wrote and performs an autobiographical monologue in the production about being HIV-positive. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED

"Everyone that's in there right now has probably done it," Clyde Polly says about Opana injections at his home. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Inside A Small Brick House At The Heart Of Indiana's Opioid Crisis

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