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Truvada is one of two HIV prevention drugs that will be available for free to qualified individuals. BSIP/Universal Images Group/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Babies in their cribs at Lambano Sanctuary, a hospice for orphaned children with HIV in Gauteng, South Africa. Andrew Aitchison/Pictures Ltd./Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Aitchison/Pictures Ltd./Corbis/Getty Images

A fisherman's boat makes its way across Lake Chilwa in Malawi. A large portion of Lake Chilwa dries out every year, and the fishing industry disappears along with it. Most fishermen then head to Lake Malawi, where there is fishing year-round. Julia Gunther hide caption

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Julia Gunther

Marchers at a candlelight vigil in San Francisco, Calif., carry a banner to call attention to the continuing battle against AIDS on May 29, 1989. The city was home to the nation's first AIDS special care unit. The unit, which opened in 1983, is the subject the documentary 5B. Jason M. Grow/AP hide caption

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Jason M. Grow/AP

1st AIDS Ward '5B' Fought To Give Patients Compassionate Care, Dignified Deaths

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In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Truvada to prevent HIV infection in people at high risk. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Expert Panel Recommends Wider Use Of Daily Pill To Prevent HIV Infections

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Jake Powell, who works in New York City, is originally from Wyoming. Powell joined the PrEP4All movement after having to go off the drug for six months because it was too costly, even for someone with health insurance. Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi hide caption

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Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi

AIDS Activists Take Aim At Gilead To Lower Price Of HIV Drug PrEP

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A paramedic takes a blood sample from a baby for a HIV test in Larkana, Pakistan, on May 9. The government is offering screenings in the wake of an HIV outbreak. Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images

HHS Secretary Alex Azar at a White House roundtable discussion of health care prices in January. Azar tells NPR his office is now in "active negotiations and discussion" with drugmakers on how to make HIV prevention medicines more available and "cost-effective." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

How HHS Secretary Reconciles Proposed Medicaid Cuts, Stopping The Spread Of HIV

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A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph shows HIV particles (orange) infecting a T cell, one of the white blood cells that play a central role in the immune system. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Bone Marrow Transplant Renders Second Patient Free Of HIV

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A staffer at the Right to Care AIDS clinic in Johannesburg administers an HIV test on a young boy. South Africa is one of the countries that receives funds from the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Gallo Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gallo Images/Getty Images

AIDS activist group ACT UP organized numerous protests on Wall Street in the 1980s. The group's tactics helped speed the process of finding an effective treatment for AIDS. Tim Clary/AP hide caption

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Tim Clary/AP

How To Demand A Medical Breakthrough: Lessons From The AIDS Fight

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Brittany Williams, a doctoral candidate at the University of Georgia, started taking Truvada when she began dating a man living with HIV. Even though the relationship ended, she continues to take it. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

More testing for HIV infection is one of the steps needed to halt the spread of the virus. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Halting U.S. HIV Epidemic By 2030: Difficult But Doable

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First lady Melania Trump with 10-year-old Grace Eline, a guest of President Trump at the State of the Union address Tuesday. Grace was diagnosed with brain cancer last year. Trump cited her experience in calling for more research into childhood cancer treatments. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

ACT UP demonstrators shout and carry posters outside the 1992 Republican National Convention. Gregory Smith/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Gregory Smith/Corbis/Getty Images

Larry Dearmon (left) and Stephen Mills pose on their wedding day at Lake Tahoe in 2013. Courtesy of Larry Dearmon hide caption

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Courtesy of Larry Dearmon

A Couple Reflects On A Loss From AIDS That Brought Them Together

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Genetics researcher He Jiankui said his lab considered ethical issues before deciding to proceed with DNA editing of human embryos to create twin girls with a modification to reduce their risk of HIV infection. Critics say the experiment was premature. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Create Genetically Modified Babies Using CRISPR

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