AIDS AIDS

The Tataya Mato week at Jameson Camp in Indianapolis is a free sleep away camp for children impacted by HIV/AIDS. Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Between Swimming And Archery, This Camp Helps Kids Overcome The Stigma Of HIV/AIDS

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Members of ACT UP hold up signs and placards during the Gay and Lesbian Pride march in New York City, June 26, 1988. The New York Historical Society/Getty Images hide caption

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The New York Historical Society/Getty Images

ACT UP At 30: Reinvigorated For Trump Fight

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Men protesting in support of more money for AIDS research marched down Fifth Avenue during the 14th annual Lesbian and Gay Pride parade in New York in 1983. Mario Suriani/AP hide caption

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Mario Suriani/AP

Researchers Clear 'Patient Zero' From AIDS Origin Story

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Courtesy of Johns Hopkins University Press

The Epidemiologist Who Crushed The Glass Ceiling And Media Stupidity

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Fred Muzaya, a 26-year-old Ugandan who has AIDS, prepares for a spinal tap to relieve the pressure in his skull, brought on by the fungal disease cryptococcal meningitis. Patrick Adams hide caption

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Patrick Adams

Doctors sew a kidney into a recipient patient during a kidney transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 2012 in Baltimore, Md. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

HIV-Positive Organ Transplants Set To Begin At Johns Hopkins

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No, he didn't repossess this car from a corrupt official. As a hobby, global health avenger Cees Klumper fixes up classic cars. This one is the actual El Camino used in the TV series My Name Is Earl. Klumper tracked it down and had it shipped to Geneva. Courtesy of Anneke Cees Klumper hide caption

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Courtesy of Anneke Cees Klumper

Truvada can dramatically reduce the risk of HIV infection when taken as a preventative medicine — if taken every day. Studies are underway to determine if young people are likely to take the pill consistently. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Would A Pill To Protect Teens From HIV Make Them Feel Invincible?

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A December celebration launching a partnership between members of the Garifuna community and a doctor in New York. The collaboration is aimed at reducing the HIV infection rate among the Garifuna. Alexandra Starr/NPR hide caption

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Alexandra Starr/NPR

An Unlikely Alliance Fights HIV In The Bronx's Afro-Honduran Diaspora

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Patient Nina Pham is hugged by Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, outside of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., on Friday. Pham was discharged after testing free of Ebola. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Peter Piot was one of the co-discoverers of the Ebola virus in 1976. "I never thought we would see such a devastating and vast epidemic," he says. Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This

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Over a decade ago, rumors spread in South Africa that sex with a virgin could cure HIV/AIDS. In 2001, 150 people gathered in Cape Town to protest the rape of children and even babies, allegedly as a result of belief in this canard. Anna Zieminski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Zieminski/AFP/Getty Images