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The King Jacob, a Portuguese-flagged cargo vessel, was the first ship to arrive near the migrant boat that sank off the Libyan coast over the weekend. The boat had been carrying more than 800 people. Alessandro Fucarini/AP hide caption

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Alessandro Fucarini/AP

Merchant Ships Called On To Aid Migrants In Mediterranean Feel The Strain

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The ground floor walls of the Otaish family's home are gone and the rest of the house is also bombed out, but they have decided to live in what's left of it. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

With Few Choices, Gaza Family Makes Bombed-Out Shell Its Home

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A photo from the wedding of Ahmed Shehata and Shaimaa Daif shows friends of the couple mocking members of the so-called Islamic State. Shehata says he staged the surprise to show his wife that ISIS was "something to laugh at, not to fear." Courtesy of Ahmed Shehata hide caption

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Courtesy of Ahmed Shehata

Egyptians Fight ISIS Fear-Mongering With Punchlines And Parody

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Safi al-Kasasbeh and his wife Saafia are the parents of Moath al-Kasasbeh, the Jordanian air force pilot captured by the self-proclaimed Islamic State in Syria. The worried parents are proud of their son, but say Jordan should not be involved in the coalition against ISIS. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

With A Son Missing, Family Questions Jordan's Mission Against ISIS

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Ronaldo Mouchawar, a native of Syria, is the founder of Souq.com, which is now considered the leading e-commerce site in the region. He says his company, which is based in Dubai, reflects a quiet transformation that is taking places in parts of the Arab world. Courtesy of Souq.com hide caption

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Courtesy of Souq.com

A Syrian Entrepreneur Looks To Build The Amazon Of The Arab World

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Syrian refugees break their fast outside their tent at a Syrian refugee camp in Marj, Lebanon, on June 29. The World Food Program says it has suspended a food voucher program serving more than 1.7 million Syrian refugees because of a funding crisis. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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Bilal Hussein/AP

The Islamic Youth Council in Derna, in eastern Libya, is among the local militant groups from Egypt to Libya that have reportedly pledged allegiance to the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov

With Cash And Cachet, The Islamic State Expands Its Empire

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Ari Zivotofsky (center) walks with then 9-year-old son Menachem, outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Nov. 7, 2011. Their case, regarding the desire to have their son's U.S. passport list his place of birth as Israel, returns to the Supreme Court this Monday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Supreme Court To Consider Case On Passports Of Jerusalem-Born Citizens

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President Obama has been wary of open-ended military commitments in the Middle East. But the president, shown speaking in Estonia on Sept. 3, now appears likely to expand the current bombing campaign against the Islamic State. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Palestinian boys at a damaged building in Rafah, the Gaza Strip, on Thursday. U.S. attempts to broker a comprehensive peace deal have again been shelved as Israel and Hamas have waged their third round of heavy fighting in Gaza in the past six years. Ibrahim Khatib/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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Ibrahim Khatib/Barcroft Media/Landov

Palestinian men walk amidst debris following an Israeli military strike in Gaza city, on July 23, 2014. Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images

Is NPR Biased In Its Gaza Coverage?

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A convoy of Israeli tanks roll near Israel's border with the Gaza Strip on Friday. There's a sense of repetition to the violence in the region, as Hamas fires rockets at Israel and Israel responds with bombs and the threat of a ground invasion. Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images

Israel And Gaza Struck By Rockets, Bombs And A Sense Of Deja Vu

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