Middle East Middle East

The indictment against 24-year-old Palestinian Ayman Mahareeq says comments he posted on Facebook illegally insulted the West Bank police force and the Palestinian Authority, which governs the West Bank. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

In The West Bank, Facebook Posts Can Get You Arrested, Or Worse

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A dangerous nuzzle? A man in western Abu Dhabi hugs a camel brought in from Saudi Arabia for beauty contests. Middle East respiratory syndrome circulates in camels across the Arabian Peninsula. Dave Yoder/National Geographic hide caption

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Dave Yoder/National Geographic

Why MERS Is Likely To Crop Up Outside The Middle East Again

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Samuel LaHoz/Intelligence Squared U.S.

Debate: Is Obama's Iran Deal Good for America?

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In this photo from 2014, passengers walk past the Middle East respiratory syndrome quarantine area at Manila's International Airport in the Phillipines. The virus is now raising public concern in South Korea. Aaron Favila/AP hide caption

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Aaron Favila/AP
Alyson Hurt/NPR

China Promises $46 Billion To Pave The Way For A Brand New Silk Road

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The King Jacob, a Portuguese-flagged cargo vessel, was the first ship to arrive near the migrant boat that sank off the Libyan coast over the weekend. The boat had been carrying more than 800 people. Alessandro Fucarini/AP hide caption

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Alessandro Fucarini/AP

Merchant Ships Called On To Aid Migrants In Mediterranean Feel The Strain

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The ground floor walls of the Otaish family's home are gone and the rest of the house is also bombed out, but they have decided to live in what's left of it. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

With Few Choices, Gaza Family Makes Bombed-Out Shell Its Home

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A photo from the wedding of Ahmed Shehata and Shaimaa Daif shows friends of the couple mocking members of the so-called Islamic State. Shehata says he staged the surprise to show his wife that ISIS was "something to laugh at, not to fear." Courtesy of Ahmed Shehata hide caption

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Courtesy of Ahmed Shehata

Egyptians Fight ISIS Fear-Mongering With Punchlines And Parody

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Safi al-Kasasbeh and his wife Saafia are the parents of Moath al-Kasasbeh, the Jordanian air force pilot captured by the self-proclaimed Islamic State in Syria. The worried parents are proud of their son, but say Jordan should not be involved in the coalition against ISIS. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

With A Son Missing, Family Questions Jordan's Mission Against ISIS

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Ronaldo Mouchawar, a native of Syria, is the founder of Souq.com, which is now considered the leading e-commerce site in the region. He says his company, which is based in Dubai, reflects a quiet transformation that is taking places in parts of the Arab world. Courtesy of Souq.com hide caption

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Courtesy of Souq.com

A Syrian Entrepreneur Looks To Build The Amazon Of The Arab World

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Syrian refugees break their fast outside their tent at a Syrian refugee camp in Marj, Lebanon, on June 29. The World Food Program says it has suspended a food voucher program serving more than 1.7 million Syrian refugees because of a funding crisis. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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Bilal Hussein/AP