Middle East Middle East

Investigative journalist Hossam Baghat (center), who founded the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, leaves a courtroom at the Cairo Criminal Court in March. Mohamed Elraai/AP hide caption

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Mohamed Elraai/AP

The Solar-powered Solar Impulse 2 aircraft prepares to take off from the Cairo International Airport in the Egyptian capital on Sunday as it heads to Abu Dhabi on the final leg of its world tour. Khaled Desouki /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki /AFP/Getty Images

Lebanese chefs celebrate in Beirut after setting a new Guinness record for what was then the biggest tub of hummus in the world — weighing over 2 tons — in October 2009. The world record effort was part of Lebanon's bid to claim hummus as its own. Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images

Give Chickpeas A Chance: Why Hummus Unites, And Divides, The Mideast

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Majd kept a journal about a time in her life when she was torn between getting married or going to school. Courtesy of Madj hide caption

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Courtesy of Madj

Diary Of A Saudi Girl: Karate Lover, Science Nerd ... Bride?

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A cart in the garden of the U.S. Consulate in Jerusalem displays produce grown in Gaza: tomatoes, sweet potatoes, eggplant, sweet and hot peppers, green onions and herbs. Like all products leaving Gaza, this shipment needed Israeli approval. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

A Tunisian woman waves her national flag as international activists gather for the World Social Forum in Tunis on March 25, 2015. Fadel Senna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fadel Senna/AFP/Getty Images

Mohammed al-Nimr is the son Shiite Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, who was executed by Saudi Arabia. Courtesy of Mohammed al-Nimr hide caption

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Courtesy of Mohammed al-Nimr

Shiite Sheikh Executed By Saudi Arabia Preached Against Violence, Son Says

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Ohio Governor John Kasich speaking at the National Press Club Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Kasich: 'Reasonable' To 'Pause' Resettlement Of Syrian Refugees

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Jacob LaLoush poses beside bougainvillea flowers outside his kosher restaurant in Sidi Bou Said, outside Tunis, in 2012. He says his is the only kosher restaurant left in all of Tunis. John Poole/NPR hide caption

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John Poole/NPR

Amid Security Threats, Tunis' Only Kosher Restaurant Shutters

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The Svalbard Global Seed Vault was opened on Feb. 26, 2008. Carved into the Arctic permafrost and filled with samples of the world's most important seeds, it's a Noah's Ark of food crops to be used in the event of a global catastrophe. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images