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People relax on a bridge in Berlin. An estimated 10,000 Israelis have moved to the German capital in the past decade or so, leaving an imprint on the city of more than 3.5 million. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Thousands Of Israelis Now Call Berlin Home And Make Their Cultural Mark

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A plump rat stuck in a manhole cover spurred volunteer firefighters and animal rescue workers to act in Bensheim, Germany, over the weekend. Berufstierrettung-Rhein-Neckar/AP hide caption

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Berufstierrettung-Rhein-Neckar/AP

Alice Dwyer plays the young Hanni Lévy in The Invisibles, which focuses on the lives of four German Jews who stayed in Germany during World War II and survived. Greenwich Entertainment hide caption

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Greenwich Entertainment

'The Invisibles' Reveals How Some Jews Survived Nazi Germany By Hiding In Plain Sight

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Cars drive near Frankfurt Airport on Tuesday in Germany. Much of Germany's autobahn system has no speed limit, and a proposal to cap speeds at about 80 mph has sparked controversy. Silas Stein/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Silas Stein/picture alliance via Getty Image

The "Big Maple Leaf" went on display at Berlin's Bode Museum in 2010. Thieves stole the gold coin with a face value of $1 million and weighing 220 pounds in a surprisingly analogue heist. Marcel Mettelsiefen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcel Mettelsiefen/AFP/Getty Images

Berlin is a tech hub, but 70 percent of the city's businesses have complained to the city's Chamber of Commerce and Industry about inadequate broadband. Rafael Dols/Getty Images hide caption

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Rafael Dols/Getty Images

Berlin Is A Tech Hub, So Why Are Germany's Internet Speeds So Slow?

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Paramedics and an emergency doctor bend over a man who had been run over by a car near the Museum Folkwang in North Rhine-Westphalia, Essen, on Tuesday. picture alliance/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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picture alliance/picture alliance via Getty Image

A man in Germany is said to have been sent the files after he requested to review his Amazon data in accordance with a European Union data protection law. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Reed Saxon/AP

The German government has agreed to make a one-time payment to Kindertransport survivors, commemorated by a statue in Berlin, Germany. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

A wolf in its enclosure at the Hexentanzplatz zoo in Thale, northern Germany. Klaus-Dietmar Gabbert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Klaus-Dietmar Gabbert/AFP/Getty Images

Wolves Are Back In Germany, But Not Always Welcome

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A police officer in Wuppertal, Germany, measures the speed of passing cars with a laser pistol in March. Oliver Berg/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Oliver Berg/picture alliance via Getty Image

German Chancellor Angela Merkel chats with CDU General Secretary Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer in Berlin last month. Kramp-Karrenbauer is among three leading candidates seeking to run the party next month. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Gert Berliner's Swedish ID card with which he eventually entered the U.S. in 1947. He lived in Berlin until he was 14 years old. Gert escaped the Nazi death camps because his parents got him on a children's transport to Sweden in 1939. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR

Gert Berliner packed this toy monkey in a suitcase when he fled for his life nearly 80 years ago. It's now part of the collection at the Jewish Museum Berlin. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR

A Toy Monkey That Escaped Nazi Germany And Reunited A Family

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