Germany Germany

The harvest is bad for German farmers this year as the country has experienced the hottest summer on record and months without rainfall. Christian Ender/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ender/Getty Images

German Farmers Struck By Drought Fear Further Damage From Climate Change

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A man raises his arm in a Nazi salute in response to heckling from leftists at a protest gathering the day after a fatal stabbing by migrant suspects triggered large protests in the city of Chemnitz in eastern Germany. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Jakiw Palij immigrated to the U.S. in 1949. According to U.S. authorities, he concealed his Nazi service. Department of Justice hide caption

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Department of Justice

Alleged Nazi Labor Camp Guard Deported To Germany

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Miriam Davoudvandi, 26, is one of many Germans who took to Twitter to share her experiences of racism starting as early as elementary school. Davoudvandi's teachers doubted her language abilities. Today she is the editor-in-chief of a hip-hop magazine and is fluent in five languages. Esme Nicholson/NPR hide caption

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Esme Nicholson/NPR

Minorities In Germany Are Sounding Off Against Racism With #MeTwo Hashtag

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Beer bottles with crowned caps crowd the conveyor belts of a filling plant in the Veltins brewery in Meschede-Grevenstein, western Germany, in January. Rainer Jensen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rainer Jensen/AFP/Getty Images

Uh-Oh, Germany Is Rapidly Running Out Of Beer Bottles

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Syrian lawyer Anwar al-Bunni, who survived torture in Syrian regime jail cells, is pictured in Berlin on March 1, 2017. He is among other Syrian torture survivors, lawyers and human rights groups who have filed criminal complaints in Germany alleging crimes against humanity and war crimes committed by top officials in President Bashar Assad's regime. Michael Kappeler/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Kappeler/AFP/Getty Images

With Syria's War Nearly Over, Victims Take The Battle To European Courts

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Thousands of Berliners come to Tempelhof on warm summer evenings, but there's always room for more. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

The Site Of The Berlin Airlift Now Serves As Refugee Shelter And Big Open Park

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Louisiana crawfish caught in waters in and around Berlin are on display at Fisch Frank fish restaurant in Berlin. They are an invasive species and authorities recently licensed a local fisherman to catch them and sell them to local restaurants. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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For Berlin, Invasive Crustaceans Are A Tough Catch And A Tough Sell

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The defendant identified as Berrin T. (right) is led past defendant Christian L. (left) ahead of their sentencing hearing Tuesday at the district court in Freiburg, Germany. Getty Images says their faces have been pixelated in accordance with court orders. Thomas Kienzle/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Kienzle/AFP/Getty Images

The Garzweiler coal mine and power plant near the city of Grevenbroich in western Germany. Plans to expand an open-pit brown coal mine in the eastern German village of Pödelwitz have prompted protests. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

Germany Bulldozes Old Villages For Coal Despite Lower Emissions Goals

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Martin Kaste/NPR

For Local Cops In Germany, No Talk Of 'Sanctuary Cities'

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President Trump arrives at the NATO summit in Brussels. The House is scheduled to take up a measure Wednesday reaffirming U.S. support for NATO; the Senate approved a similar measure Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images

In what was supposed to be a brief photo op ahead of a breakfast meeting, President Trump launched a verbal attack against NATO defense spending as cameras clicked away. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks with other Europen Union leaders during a summit Thursday in Brussels. Earlier in the day she delivered a speech to a restive German parliament, deeply divided over matters of migration. Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images

Merkel's Fragile Coalition Teeters On Edge Of Migration Question

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel leaves a press conference after a leadership meeting at her party headquarters in Berlin on Monday. Hardliners in her conservative bloc want to bar asylum-seekers from entering Germany if they've already applied or registered for asylum in other European countries. Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alternative for Germany leaders Alexander Gauland and Alice Weidel listen to German Chancellor Angela Merkel answer questions at Germany's parliament on June 6. Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images