Germany Germany

Residents of Salzigitter shop at the local mall. Officials say their community and its resources are being overwhelmed by refugees, most of them from Syria. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

A tractor spreads chemicals on a field near Prenzlau, Germany, in 2016. Germany ended a stalemate among member states of the European Union, approving an extension of the herbicide glyphosate, which is widely used in large-scale farming. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, right, and the chairman of the German Christian Social Union state group, Alexander Dobrindt, center, arrive for a faction meeting at the Bundestag, in Berlin, on Monday. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Sohn/AP

German Chancellor and leader of the German Christian Democrats (CDU) Angela Merkel, stands with leading members of her party, as she speaks to the media after preliminary coalition talks collapsed on Sunday. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives at her Berlin party headquarters Friday for talks with members of potential coalition parties to form a new government. Kay Nietfeld/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kay Nietfeld/AFP/Getty Images

Germany's Merkel, Weakened After Poor Election Showing, Struggles To Form Government

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564668822/565026228" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Germany's top court has ruled that parliament must legally recognize a third gender from birth. A complaint was brought by a person identified only as Vanja, pictured here in 2014, who is intersex. Peter Steffen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Steffen/AFP/Getty Images

Anas Modamani speaks to the media Feb. 6 in Wuerzburg, Germany, after a court session about his lawsuit against Facebook. Modamani's suit, regarding the misuse of a selfie he took of himself with German Chancellor Angela Merkel was rejected, but his lawyer Lawyer Chan-Jo Jun, right, says that under a new law a lawsuit might not even have been necessary. Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images

With Huge Fines, German Law Pushes Social Networks To Delete Abusive Posts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561024666/561063732" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alexander Gauland, 76, and Alice Weidel, 38, are the leaders of the populist, anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party. They will both take seats in the country's Parliament later this month. John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images

The far-right Alternative for Germany party came in third place nationally, but in the eastern state of Saxony, where the town of Pirna is located, the party finished first with 27 percent of the vote. Jens Schlueter/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jens Schlueter/Getty Images

Aktham Abulhusn rides the subway on his way to Berlin Alexanderplatz. He came from Syria to Germany in early 2015 on a student visa and now lives there on a refugee visa. Now that his German language skills are improving, he is trying to find a girlfriend. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jacobia Dahm for NPR

Berlin's Tegel is a small and far from modern airport. But many city residents value its convenience and its history and don't want it to close. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Sohn/AP

A poster in Essen showing women in traditional German dress promotes the far-right party Alternative for Germany. The poster says, "Colorful variety? We have already." Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Meissner/AP

Alice Weidel and Alexander Gauland, leading candidates of the right-wing, populist Alternative for Germany (AfD) political party, stand near an AfD poster that reads: "Crime Through Immigration, The Refugee Wave Leaves Behind Clues!" Sept. 18 in Berlin. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images