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Caretaker Sylvana Tyralla conducts a memory exercise with AlexA nursing home residents in one of two former East German "remembrance rooms." Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

German Chancellor Angela Merkel shakes hands Friday with the leader of the Social Democratic Party, Martin Schulz. Merkel's conservatives reached a "breakthrough" deal with the Social Democrats toward building a new coalition government, sources close to the negotiations said. John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images

German Leaders Agree On New Coalition Talks, But Hurdles Remain

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel, head of the Christian Democratic Union, smiles for the media between Horst Seehofer of the Christian Social Union (left) and Martin Schulz of the Social Democratic Party. The three emerged Friday from all-night preliminary coalition talks in Berlin saying they had reached a preliminary deal. Steffi Loos/Getty Images hide caption

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Steffi Loos/Getty Images

German Chancellor Angela Merkel delivers a statement prior to a meeting in Berlin with conservative and Social Democratic party leaders. Jorg Carstensen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jorg Carstensen/AFP/Getty Images

Yvonne Schmittenberg holds a tray of weld nuts produced by Schmittenberg Metal Works. They're used in the automotive industry. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

How Germany Wins At Manufacturing — For Now

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Residents of Salzigitter shop at the local mall. Officials say their community and its resources are being overwhelmed by refugees, most of them from Syria. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

A tractor spreads chemicals on a field near Prenzlau, Germany, in 2016. Germany ended a stalemate among member states of the European Union, approving an extension of the herbicide glyphosate, which is widely used in large-scale farming. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel, right, and the chairman of the German Christian Social Union state group, Alexander Dobrindt, center, arrive for a faction meeting at the Bundestag, in Berlin, on Monday. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

German Chancellor and leader of the German Christian Democrats (CDU) Angela Merkel, stands with leading members of her party, as she speaks to the media after preliminary coalition talks collapsed on Sunday. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives at her Berlin party headquarters Friday for talks with members of potential coalition parties to form a new government. Kay Nietfeld/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kay Nietfeld/AFP/Getty Images

Germany's Merkel, Weakened After Poor Election Showing, Struggles To Form Government

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Germany's top court has ruled that parliament must legally recognize a third gender from birth. A complaint was brought by a person identified only as Vanja, pictured here in 2014, who is intersex. Peter Steffen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Steffen/AFP/Getty Images

Anas Modamani speaks to the media Feb. 6 in Wuerzburg, Germany, after a court session about his lawsuit against Facebook. Modamani's suit, regarding the misuse of a selfie he took of himself with German Chancellor Angela Merkel was rejected, but his lawyer Lawyer Chan-Jo Jun, right, says that under a new law a lawsuit might not even have been necessary. Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images

With Huge Fines, German Law Pushes Social Networks To Delete Abusive Posts

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Alexander Gauland, 76, and Alice Weidel, 38, are the leaders of the populist, anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany party. They will both take seats in the country's Parliament later this month. John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Macdougall/AFP/Getty Images