Germany Germany

The apartment (upper right) in a communist-era housing block in Leipzig, a city in eastern Germany is the location where a Syrian man, suspected of plotting a jihadist bomb attack, was arrested on Monday. After a nationwide manhunt, the man was caught by fellow Syrian refugees. The case has sparked fresh calls for greater checks on asylum seekers. John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images

Robert Ley (center), head of the German Labor Front, visits Ruegen in 1936. ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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ullstein bild via Getty Images

Along Germany's Coast, A Nazi Resort Becomes An Upscale Destination

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Berlin has become a vegan mecca, with ice cream shops like Kontor Eismanufaktur Berlin (pictured here), restaurants and even butchers catering to a plant-based diet. Now Germany's nutritionists warn that a vegan diet can't provide all a body needs. Courtesy of Susan Stone hide caption

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Courtesy of Susan Stone

Can A Vegan Diet Give You All You Need? German Nutritionists Say 'Nein'

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Job consultant Saskia Ben jemaa sits in a welcome center for immigrants on Aug. 18 in Berlin. The center assists immigrants and refugees with asylum status in finding jobs, housing and qualification recognition of their previous employment and education. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images

Firas Awad (left) and wife Tamam Aldrawsha, from Syria, spend hours studying German every day. Awad wants to complete the pharmacy studies he abandoned because of the Syrian war, and Aldrawsha wants to become a nurse. "I want to be useful," she says. "Useful for my family and useful for this country." Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

In A Tiny German Town, Residents And Refugees Adapt

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People mourn near a shopping center in Munich on July 23, the day after a shooting spree there left nine victims dead. The attack was one of several that month in Germany. Johannes Simon/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Simon/Getty Images

Bavarian Interior Minister Joachim Herrmann (center), briefs the media in Ansbach, Germany on Monday. Bavaria's top security official says a man who blew himself up after being turned away from an open-air music festival in Ansbach was a 27-year-old Syrian who had been denied asylum. Matthias Schrader/AP hide caption

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Matthias Schrader/AP

German Chancellor Angela Merkel (right), and British Prime Minister Theresa May (left), listen to translations during a joint news conference in Berlin on July 20. They are the two most important figures in the negotiations over Britain's departure from the European Union, the so-called Brexit. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

The Two Female Leaders Who Have To Figure Out The Brexit

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A woman cries at a make shift memorial site on Saturday near the Olympia shopping center where a shooting took place leaving nine people dead the day in Munich, Germany. Sebastian Widmann/AP hide caption

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Sebastian Widmann/AP