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A police officer in Wuppertal, Germany, measures the speed of passing cars with a laser pistol in March. Oliver Berg/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Oliver Berg/picture alliance via Getty Image

German Chancellor Angela Merkel chats with CDU General Secretary Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer in Berlin last month. Kramp-Karrenbauer is among three leading candidates seeking to run the party next month. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Gert Berliner's Swedish ID card with which he eventually entered the U.S. in 1947. He lived in Berlin until he was 14 years old. Gert escaped the Nazi death camps because his parents got him on a children's transport to Sweden in 1939. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR

Gert Berliner packed this toy monkey in a suitcase when he fled for his life nearly 80 years ago. It's now part of the collection at the Jewish Museum Berlin. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR

A Toy Monkey That Escaped Nazi Germany And Reunited A Family

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Defendant Johann Rehbogen, a 94-year-old former SS guard, appears at the regional court in Münster, Germany, on Tuesday. Guido Kirchner/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Guido Kirchner/AFP/Getty Images

German Chancellor Angela Merkel says she is stepping down from leading her party, announcing her decision after the Christian Democratic Union's recent election struggles. Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters hide caption

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Germany's Angela Merkel Says She Won't Seek Re-Election, Will Leave Party Role

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The supermarket poisoner, shown here during a court hearing earlier this month in Ravensburg, Germany, was found guilty of attempted murder. Marijan Murat/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Marijan Murat/picture alliance via Getty Image

Leon Hakobian shows on his mobile phone a preliminary draft of a logo for a new Jewish grouping within Germany's far-right Alternative for Germany party, during the Jewish group's founding event on Oct. 7 in Wiesbaden, a city in Germany's western state of Hesse. Frank Rumpenhorst/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frank Rumpenhorst/AFP/Getty Images

Meet The Jews Of The German Far Right

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Katrin Ebner-Steiner (center), regional leader of the Alternative for Germany, celebrates with party co-leader Alice Weidel (right) as election results roll in Sunday in Mamming, Germany. Armin Weigel/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Armin Weigel/AFP/Getty Images

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's political allies in the wealthy alpine state of Bavaria risk losing ground to the far-right Alternative for Germany, or AfD, party in upcoming regional elections. Pool/Zick,Jochen-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Zick,Jochen-Pool/Getty Images

Germany's Far Right Finds A New Stronghold In Bavaria, And It's Costing Merkel

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North Rhine-Westphalia's interior minister Herbert Reul, seen with police officers, apologized for mistakes that left a Syrian man falsely imprisoned and then dead when a fire broke out in the jail. Oliver Berg/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Oliver Berg/picture alliance via Getty Image

Containers from China are stacked next to the train station in the Duisburg port in July. Approximately 25 trains a week use a new connection between Duisburg and the Chinese cities of Chongqing and Yiwu. Several European countries use the railway for trading goods both from and into China. Maja Hitij/Getty Images hide caption

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Maja Hitij/Getty Images

Chinese Companies Get Tech-Savvy Gobbling Up Germany's Factories

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Björn Höcke (center), a politician from the Alternative for Germany party, participates in a march in Chemnitz, eastern Germany, on Sept. 1, after several nationalist groups called for marches protesting the killing of a German man allegedly by migrants. Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Jens Meyer/AP

Cardinal Reinhard Marx and Bishop Stephan Ackermann present the results of the study on sexual abuse of minors by Germany's Catholic priests and clerics on Tuesday in Fulda, Germany. Daniel Roland/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Roland/AFP/Getty Images