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Earlier this month, Dr. Sadiqu al-Mousllie, accompanied by his family and a few members of their mosque, stood in downtown Braunschweig, Germany, and held up signs that read: "I am a Moslem. What would you like to know?" in an effort to promote dialogue between Muslims and non-Muslims. Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie hide caption

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Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie

A German Muslim Asks His Compatriots: 'What Do You Want To Know?'

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German police officers gather in preparation for a demonstration by members of LEGIDA, the Leipzig arm of the anti-immigrant movement PEGIDA. Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters/Landov

A new BMW X4 vehicle is unveiled during a March 2014 news conference at the BMW manufacturing plant in Greer, S.C. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Chuck Burton/AP

Analysts Watch For Impacts Of European Economic Weakness On U.S.

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The warden's barracks at a satellite camp of the Buchenwald concentration camp in Schwerte, Germany, on Jan. 13. According to media reports, the city has proposed housing around 20 refugees in buildings at the camp. The move has drawn protests in Germany. Bernd Thissen/DPA/Landov hide caption

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Bernd Thissen/DPA/Landov

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, front third from left, attends a vigil in Berlin organized by a German Muslim group to commemorate the victims of last week's attacks in Paris. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

A protester in Dresden, Germany, holds a poster Monday showing Chancellor Angela Merkel wearing a headscarf during a rally organized by PEGIDA, a group that is against what it calls the "Islamization of Europe." Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Jens Meyer/AP

Ali Akdeniz, 85, who always dresses to impress, in some of his various outfits in Berlin. Thanks to photographer Zoe Spawton, he became the star of a blog called What Ali Wore. Courtesy of Zoe Spawton hide caption

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Courtesy of Zoe Spawton

Age 85 And Still Stylish On The Streets Of Berlin

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Alfons R. of Hamburg, Germany (shown in this undated photo), converted to Islam at age 17. Later, he went to Turkey, then Syria, to join ISIS. He was killed this past summer. Courtesy of Manfred Karg hide caption

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Courtesy of Manfred Karg

From German Teen To ISIS Jihadist: A Father's Struggle To Understand

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel uses a mobile phone during a meeting of the German federal parliament in Berlin, on Nov. 28, 2013. The country's labor minister supports a call that would prohibit employers from sending emails to employees after normal business hours. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

German Government May Say 'Nein' To After Work Emails

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What do you get when three Israelis, two Iranians and a German walk into a room? A Berlin-based world music ensemble known as Sistanagila, named after an Iranian province — Sistan and Baluchestan — and the popular Jewish folk song "Hava Nagila." Courtesy of Sistanagila hide caption

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Courtesy of Sistanagila

The Rare Place Where Israelis And Iranians Play Together

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Hasso Herschel, shown in this undated photo, escaped from East Germany in 1961 by using a borrowed passport. Over the next decade, he helped more than 1,000 people flee by smuggling them through tunnels and hiding them in cars. Courtesy of Hasso Herschel hide caption

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Courtesy of Hasso Herschel

The Cold War Broadcast That Gave East German Dissidents A Voice

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