Germany Germany
Stories About

Germany

Martin Kaste/NPR

For Local Cops In Germany, No Talk Of 'Sanctuary Cities'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/633874608/633891498" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump arrives at the NATO summit in Brussels. The House is scheduled to take up a measure Wednesday reaffirming U.S. support for NATO; the Senate approved a similar measure Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images

In what was supposed to be a brief photo op ahead of a breakfast meeting, President Trump launched a verbal attack against NATO defense spending as cameras clicked away. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks with other Europen Union leaders during a summit Thursday in Brussels. Earlier in the day she delivered a speech to a restive German parliament, deeply divided over matters of migration. Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images

Merkel's Fragile Coalition Teeters On Edge Of Migration Question

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624329960/624508655" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

German Chancellor Angela Merkel leaves a press conference after a leadership meeting at her party headquarters in Berlin on Monday. Hardliners in her conservative bloc want to bar asylum-seekers from entering Germany if they've already applied or registered for asylum in other European countries. Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images

Alternative for Germany leaders Alexander Gauland and Alice Weidel listen to German Chancellor Angela Merkel answer questions at Germany's parliament on June 6. Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell gets in his car after an accreditation ceremony for new ambassadors in Berlin on May 8. Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

Uproar Continues Over Pro-Right Remarks By U.S. Ambassador To Germany

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/617799840/617799841" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A road sign on Hamburg's Max-Brauer-Allee warns motorists that older diesel vehicles are banned from using this stretch of road. Hamburg is the first German city to ban older diesel vehicles. Daniel Bockwoldt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Bockwoldt/AFP/Getty Images

Could A Diesel Ban In Hamburg, Germany, Cause More Pollution? Some Residents Worry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/615562825/615567602" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Police on patrol in three German airports have launched investigations into 20 families that pulled their children out of school to go on vacation. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell (left) and German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier greet the media during Grenell's accreditation process at the Bellevue Palace in Berlin on Tuesday. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Sohn/AP