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Customers sit on the patio of a Chicago Starbucks store after it was closed on May 29. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

'I'm Not Aware Of That': Starbucks Employees Receive Racial Bias Training

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Starbucks is shutting down thousands of its coffee shops Tuesday afternoon to host racial bias training for its employees. A sign at one of the company's cafes in Portland, Maine, informs customers that it will shut its doors at 2:30 p.m. ET. Scott Mayerowitz/AP hide caption

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Scott Mayerowitz/AP

A sign is posted May 25 in the window of a Starbucks store, in Chicago. Starbucks will close more than 8,000 stores nationwide on Tuesday to conduct anti-bias training for employees. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

On 'White Fear Being Weaponized' And How To Respond

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Starbucks is closing more than 8,000 U.S. stores on the afternoon of May 29 to conduct racial-bias training. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Starbucks Training Focuses On The Evolving Study Of Unconscious Bias

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Rashon Nelson speaks as Donte Robinson looks on during an interview with the Associated Press last month in Philadelphia. Their arrests at a local Starbucks quickly became a viral video and galvanized people around the country who saw the incident as modern-day racism. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

After two men were arrested at a Starbucks in Philadelphia, people are talking about how African-Americans are treated in public spaces. SAUL LOEB/Getty Images hide caption

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SAUL LOEB/Getty Images

Outrage Over Arrests At Philly Starbucks Fuels Twitter Conversations

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Rashon Nelson (left) and Donte Robinson say they hope their arrest at a Philadelphia Starbucks one week ago helps elicit change and doesn't happen to anyone else. A video of their arrest, viewed 11 million times, has sparked outrage and protest. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

Starbucks is mired in controversy after the arrests of two black men last week in one of its Philadelphia locations. But recent history shows the coffee chain is no stranger to cultural conflict. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Protesters demonstrate outside a Starbucks in Philadelphia on Sunday, several days after police arrested two black men who were waiting inside the Center City coffee shop. The chain has announced it will close for an afternoon on May 29 for companywide racial-bias training. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

The 2020 election cycle might have already started. The Federal Election Commission shows that 129 people have filed to run for president in the next election. Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR hide caption

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Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Starbucks Chairman and CEO Howard Schultz says the company plans to hire 10,000 refugees over the next five years, in response to President Trump's executive order on immigration. Schultz says it "effectively [bans] people from several predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States, including refugees fleeing wars." Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP