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A gender-neutral sign is posted outside a bathrooms at a restaurant in Durham, N.C. Many North Carolina businesses put gender-neutral signs on toilets after the "bathroom bill" was passed. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

Sam Smith, Brittany Smith and their daughter Erelah outside their Charlotte home. The Smiths moved to Charlotte looking for change and opportunity. They are part of an influx of African Americans to Mecklenburg County, where the African American population has ballooned by 64% since 2000. Swikar Patel for NPR hide caption

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Swikar Patel for NPR

As Employment Rises, African American Transplants Ride Jobs Wave To The South

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Sylvia Hatchell, who has led the Tar Heels since 1986, did not address the allegations against her or the findings of the independent report. Robert Franklin/AP hide caption

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Robert Franklin/AP

Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh had some sharp questions about partisan gerrymandering, as the court heard arguments on it Tuesday. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Kavanaugh Seems Conflicted On Partisan Gerrymandering At Supreme Court Arguments

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Demonstrators protest partisan redistricting in 2017 during oral arguments in a case out of Wisconsin. Olivier Douliery/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/Getty Images

The Supreme Court Takes Another Look At Partisan Redistricting

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Mark Harris, Republican candidate in North Carolina's 9th Congressional District race, prepares to testify on Thursday, the fourth day of the State Board of Elections hearing. Travis Long/Pool/News & Observer hide caption

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Travis Long/Pool/News & Observer

New Election Called In North Carolina House Race

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Mark Harris, Republican candidate in North Carolina's 9th Congressional race, fights back tears at the conclusion of his son John Harris's testimony during the third day of a North Carolina State Board of Elections hearing on the 9th Congressional District voting irregularities. Travis Long/News & Observer / Pool hide caption

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Travis Long/News & Observer / Pool

Mark Harris (left) and Dan McCready Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Chuck Burton/AP

Officials Describe 'Coordinated, Unlawful' Scheme In Disputed N.C. Election

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North Carolina 9th district Republican congressional candidate Mark Harris, with his wife Beth, claims victory in his congressional race in Monroe, N.C. The race, however, has yet to be certified as authorities look into fraud claims in the eastern part of the district. Nell Redmond/AP hide caption

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Nell Redmond/AP

'Whatever It Took': Republican Mark Harris' Path To The Election That Won't End

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