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Kimberly Spainhower hugs her daughter Chloe, 13, while her husband Ryan Spainhower searches through the ashes of their burned home in Paradise, Calif., last week. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Ryan Spainhower and his wife Kimberly discover a coin they had made during their honeymoon amidst the burned ashes of their home in Paradise, Calif., on Sunday. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

A search and rescue worker, looking for Camp Fire victims, carries Susie Q. to safety after the cadaver dog fell through rubble at the Holly Hills Mobile Estates on Wednesday in Paradise, Calif. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Camp Fire Missing-Persons List Grows To More Than 300 Names

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A car passes through flames on Highway 299 as the Carr Fire burns through Shasta, Calif., on July 26. Fueled by high temperatures, wind and low humidity, the blaze has destroyed multiple structures and killed seven people. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Firefighters in Santa Barbara County, Calif., on Wednesday. A firefighter whose name has not been released was killed Thursday while battling the massive Thomas Fire, which straddles Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County via AP hide caption

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Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County via AP

A handmade sign is seen attached to the Napa Valley welcome sign on Oct. 16, 2017 in Oakville, Calif. At least 40 people are confirmed dead, dozens are still missing, and at least 5,700 buildings have been destroyed since wildfires broke out a week ago. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Debbie Wolfe looks at the antique pitcher that once belonged to her grandmother after finding it in the burned ruins of her home on Tuesday in Santa Rosa, Calif. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Napa County firefighter Jason Sheumann sprays water on a home as he battles flames from a wildfire on Monday in Napa, Calif. Wildfires whipped by powerful winds swept through Northern California sending residents on a headlong flight to safety through smoke and flames as homes burned. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

A swing set is all that remains in the backyard of a house in Middletown, Calif., after a devastating wildfire. Birth certificates and marriage licenses were among the important things destroyed. Lesley McClurg/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/Capital Public Radio

Proof Of Citizenship Up In Flames After California Wildfires

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The King Fire burned 100,000 acres in the Eldorado National Forest in Northern California — 50,000 of those acres in one day. Now the danger is mudslides. Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

In California, Fire Plus Drought Plus Rain Add Up To Mud

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