D.C. D.C.
Stories About

D.C.

Starbucks is opening its first deaf-friendly store in the U.S., where employees will be versed in American Sign Language and stores will be designed to better serve deaf people. Courtesy of Starbucks hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Starbucks

Nationals Park beer seller Christy Colt talks to a customer in the stands before a recent Nationals game. Tyrone Turner/WAMU hide caption

toggle caption
Tyrone Turner/WAMU

She Sells Beer And Brings Cheer To Fans In D.C.'s Baseball Stands

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/627740687/635832636" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(Left) Stacy, and sister Tracy reminisce over a collage of photos of Maleak Coffin, who died three days after being shot in December. The blanket was gifted to the family by Maleak's girlfriend, Marshay Walker. Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eslah Attar/NPR

Atara Bernstein and Ariel Pasternak founded Pineapple Collaborative to create a space where women in food could share ideas. Benjamin Herskovitz/courtesy Pineapple Collaborative hide caption

toggle caption
Benjamin Herskovitz/courtesy Pineapple Collaborative

Ballou High School, in Washington, D.C.'s Southeast quadrant, is located in one of the city's poorest neighborhoods and has struggled academically for years. An investigation by WAMU and NPR has found that the school's administration graduated dozens of students despite high rates of unexcused absences. Tyrone Turner/WAMU hide caption

toggle caption
Tyrone Turner/WAMU

In D.C., 34 Percent Of Graduates Received A Diploma Against District Policy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/581036306/581930213" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hundreds of people took part in Washington, D.C.'s "Grocery Walk" to demonstrate the difficulty of getting fresh food in some areas. Brian Oh /Courtesy of DC Greens hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Oh /Courtesy of DC Greens
LA Johnson/NPR

Episode 2: 'They Can't Just Be Average'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/559535682/559999119" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The ACLU and three other plaintiffs have filed a lawsuit against the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, alleging its advertising guidelines are unconstitutional. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Every Senior At This Struggling High School Was Accepted To College

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/524357071/534876877" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Protesters march during a May Day demonstration outside of a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) office on May 1, 2017 in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A viral image last week claimed 14 girls of color went missing in 24 hours in D.C. — though police say that's untrue. But the facts are startling, with very real consequences. Metropolitan PD, Washington DC hide caption

toggle caption
Metropolitan PD, Washington DC

Goldlink's new single is out now. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

Goldlink, 'Meditation'

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/519647719/519651017" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Comet Ping Pong, a pizzeria in Washington, D.C., has been made the center of a bizarre online conspiracy theory — with real-world consequences. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
The Washington Post/Getty Images