Midwest Midwest

Rainbow trout on a grill. Yia Vang says that food played a central role in his home — his mother grew vegetables and his father cooked meat over a fire pit in the backyard. Courtesy of Mary Jo Horrman hide caption

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Courtesy of Mary Jo Horrman

There's been a lot of public and private investment in Kansas City's downtown since the 1990s. Sarah McCammon /NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon /NPR

As Kansas City Booms And Sprawls, Trying Not To Forget Those In Between

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During the day on Aug. 21, large swaths of farmland will be plunged into darkness, and temperatures will drop about 10 degrees. Scientists are waiting to see how crops and animals react. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Farmer Wendy Johnson markets hogs, chickens, eggs and seasonal turkeys. She also grows organic row crops at Joia Food Farm near Charles City, Iowa. Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

Cairo has lost more than half of its population in recent decades. Today, there are just under 3,000 people left. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Tired Of Promises, A Struggling Small Town Wants Problems Solved

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Green shoots of cereal rye, a popular cover crop, emerge in a field where corn was recently harvested in Iowa. The grass will go dormant in winter, then resume growing in the spring. Less than three percent of corn fields in the state have cover crops. Courtesy of Practical Farmers of Iowa hide caption

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Courtesy of Practical Farmers of Iowa

North Platte Canteen officers pose for a publicity photo, including (left to right) Helen Christ, Mayme Wyman, Jessie Hutchens, Edna Neid, and Opal Smith. Courtesy of the Lincoln County Historical Society hide caption

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Courtesy of the Lincoln County Historical Society

A customer fills up at a gas station in Chillicothe, Ill., in December. Low prices have meant big savings for consumers, but urban planners worry that cheap gas will encourage sprawl. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

$1.22 A Gallon: Cheap Gas Raises Fears Of Urban Sprawl

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Mark Weborg, a fourth-generation fisherman in Door County, Wis. Amanda Vinicky/WUIS hide caption

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Amanda Vinicky/WUIS

In The Upper Midwest, Summertime Means Fish Boils

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A harmful trio (from left): a deer tick, lone star tick and dog tick. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images