Wisconsin Wisconsin

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks at the Western Conservative Summit, hosted by the Centennial Institute, Colorado Christian University's think tank, in Denver, last month. Walker is announcing a run for the White House, joining more than a dozen Republicans to enter the 2016 contest. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

This combination made with file photos provided by the Madison, Wis., police department and Wisconsin Department of Corrections shows Madison Police officer Matt Kenny (left) and Tony Robinson, a biracial man who was killed by the officer. Kenny shot the unarmed 19-year-old in an apartment house on March 6. Uncredited/AP hide caption

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Uncredited/AP

Frank Kaminsky of the Wisconsin Badgers will face off against the Duke Blue Devils' Jahlil Okafor in Monday night's NCAA title game. When the teams played in December, Duke won 80-70. Mike McGinnis/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike McGinnis/Getty Images

NCAA Men's Final: Wisconsin And Duke Play For It All Monday Night

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A makeshift memorial is seen on March 11 in Madison, Wis., in remembrance of 19-year-old Tony Robinson, who was fatally shot by a Madison police officer on March 6. Carrie Antlfinger/AP hide caption

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Carrie Antlfinger/AP

Madison Mayor Paul Soglin addresses a crowd of protesters on Martin Luther King Boulevard in Madison, Wis., during a protest of the shooting death of Tony Robinson. Andy Manis/AP hide caption

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Andy Manis/AP

Racial Tension Draws Parallels, But Madison Is No Ferguson

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Hundreds of union members rally outside the Capitol in Madison on Tuesday to oppose a Republican-led measure that would make Wisconsin a right-to-work state. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov

Gov. Scott Walker Goes Head-To-Head With Labor Over Right-To-Work

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Wisconsin Governor To Sign Right-To-Work Bill Amid Protests

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Roger Hanson began rebuilding the ice sculpture the day after his original 60-foot work collapsed. He's determined to restore the sculpture in time for a series of light shows planned around it. Matthew Rethaber/WXPR hide caption

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Matthew Rethaber/WXPR

Wisconsin Sculptor Rebuilds After 60-Foot Ice Sculpture Collapses

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Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker spoke about taking on public employee unions, and the protests that followed, at a recent candidates forum in Iowa. He said what people may not know is that protesters — as many as 1,000 of them — showed up outside his home while his family was there. He says he also received death threats. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Gov. Scott Walker Eyes 2016, But Can He Get Past Labor's Loathing?

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