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Mercedes-Benz, Ford and Volkswagen workers block the Anchieta highway in Sao Bernardo do Campo. Thousands of metalworkers marched to protest layoffs by carmakers expecting little or no rebound from a sharp 2014 downturn. Adonis Guerra/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Adonis Guerra/Reuters/Landov

In Brazil, A Once-High-Flying Economy Takes A Tumble

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United States' Abby Wambach fights for the ball with Brazil's Bruna Benites during a final match of the International Women's Football Tournament in Brasilia, Brazil, Sunday. The game ended in a draw, giving Brazil the tournament victory. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff begins to cry as she delivers a speech during the final report of the National Truth Commission on Violation of Human Rights during the military dictatorship from 1964-1985 in Brasilia on Wednesday. She is among the thousands who were tortured during that brutal period. Ed Ferreira/Agencia Estado/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Ed Ferreira/Agencia Estado/Xinhua/Landov

Brazil's Tearful President Praises Report On Abuses Of A Dictatorship

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Brazilian fruits, including jambu and tapereba (lower right), displayed for a gathering of chefs in Sao Paolo. Paula Moura for NPR hide caption

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Paula Moura for NPR

Ferran Adria And Fellow Star Chefs Talk Biodiversity In Brazil

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Residents look on as Brazilian military police officers patrol Mare, one of the largest complexes of favelas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on March 30. In one of the world's most violent countries, homicide rates are dropping — but only for whites. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

In Brazil, Race Is A Matter Of Life And Violent Death

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Brazil's judicial system faces a massive backlog of cases — and stacks of paperwork. One group of five judges in Sao Paulo is currently handling 1.6 million cases. G Dettmar/National Council of Justice hide caption

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G Dettmar/National Council of Justice

Brazil: The Land Of Many Lawyers And Very Slow Justice

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A woman has her fingerprints checked with a new biometric identification machine before voting in Brasilia Sunday. More than 142 million Brazilians went to the polls, ending a dramatic campaign. Evaristo SA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Evaristo SA/AFP/Getty Images

Challenger Marina Silva (left) and incumbent Dilma Rousseff face off during a presidential debate in Aparecida, Brazil, in September. Sebastiao Moreira/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Sebastiao Moreira/EPA/Landov

Brazil's Election Culminates A Season Filled With Shocks

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Antonio Cavalcante had a candidate for governor successfully barred after proving he had embezzled millions of dollars while he was a state legislator. Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR hide caption

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Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR

How One Chauffeur Took Down A Corrupt Brazilian Politician

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The photographer Sebastiao Salgado, in New York City on Thursday, says we are at a "special moment" — our world now needs to be protected from climate change and other forces. Misha Friedman for NPR hide caption

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Misha Friedman for NPR

Marina Silva, shown here in Rio de Janeiro on Wednesday, is tied in polls with incumbent President Dilma Rousseff. Silva, the candidate for Brazil's Socialist Party, says if elected next month, she would be "the first social environmentalist president." Silvia Izquierdo/AP hide caption

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Silvia Izquierdo/AP

Could Brazil Have The First 'Green' President Of A Major Economy?

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