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Soccer buddies Lahis Maria Ramos Veras, 14 (left), and Milena Medeiros dos Santos, 16, don't let taunts keep them from playing. Lahis goes by the nickname "Lala." Lianne Milton for NPR hide caption

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Lianne Milton for NPR

Mean Boys Can't Keep Girls Off The Soccer Field: #15Girls

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Beatriz and Fabio Costa Vasconcelos pose for a photo in a park in Rio de Janiero. Brazilian couples are increasingly hiring professional photographers to take pictures when the wife is pregnant. The results are widely shared on social media. Courtesy of Ale Crisostomo & Alexandre Carnieri. hide caption

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Courtesy of Ale Crisostomo & Alexandre Carnieri.

If You're Expecting In Brazil, You Need A Pregnancy Photographer

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A photo from 1875 in Rio de Janeiro shows women street sellers called "quitandeiras," also known as "slaves who earn." A portion of the profits was returned to their masters. Marc Ferrez/Moreira Salles Institute hide caption

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Marc Ferrez/Moreira Salles Institute

Brazil Enslaved

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Almost everyone who owns a home in the city of Petropolis — where the Brazilian royal family once had a summer palace — still pays tax to the descendants of the former rulers. Amadeu Júnior via Flickr hide caption

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Amadeu Júnior via Flickr

For Brazil's 1 Percenters, The Land Stays In The Family Forever

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Sisters Francine and Fernanda Gravina have German, Italian, African and indigenous ancestry. Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR hide caption

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Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR

Dark-Skinned Or Black? How Afro-Brazilians Are Forging A Collective Identity

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Valdelice Da Silva Dias Salum, 77, says she channels the spirits of famous painters to create her artwork. Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR hide caption

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Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR

Brazil's Mediums Channel Dead Artists. Is It Worship Or Just Delusion?

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Bela Gil is a nutritionist, a chef with several cookbooks to her name and host of her own TV show. Wikimedia hide caption

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Wikimedia

Brazilians Cybershame Gilberto Gil's Daughter For Healthful Lunchbox

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The Brazilian national flag flutters at the front of the headquarters of the Brazilian state oil giant Petrobras, in Rio de Janeiro. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

Expats Find Brazil's Reputation For Race-Blindness Is Undone By Reality

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Brazil spent billions renovating and building World Cup stadiums. Almost a year after the tournament ended, the nation is still trying to figure out what to do with them. The Mane Garrincha Stadium in Brasilia, Brazil (shown here in April 2014), was the most expensive of the stadiums — at a cost of $550 million — and is now being used as a bus parking lot. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Brazil's World Cup Legacy Includes $550M Stadium-Turned-Parking Lot

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During her lifetime, singer and dancer Carmen Miranda (shown here in a dressing room at the London Palladium in 1948) was a huge success in the United States, but rejected at home in Brazil as a sellout. George Konig/Keystone Features/Getty Images hide caption

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George Konig/Keystone Features/Getty Images

Of Fruit Hats And 'Happy Tropics,' A Renaissance For Carmen Miranda

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