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Lindomar Pena, a virologist at a lab in Recife, Brazil, holds a box of vials used to store samples of the Zika virus in huge freezers. Catherine Osborn/For NPR hide caption

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Catherine Osborn/For NPR

Reporting On The Zika Virus Means Getting Up Close And Personal

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Marcia Andrade, an agent from Brazil's Ministry of Health, interviews Camila Alves, 22. A friend holds Alves' 2-month-old daughter. Catherine Osborn for NPR hide caption

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Catherine Osborn for NPR

Disease Detectives In Brazil Go Door-To-Door To Solve Zika Mystery

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Born in December, Valentina Vitoria has microcephaly, the birth defect that causes an abnormally small head and can cause brain damage as well. Her mother is 32-year-old Fabiane Lopes. Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR hide caption

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Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR

Moms And Infants Are Abandoned In Brazil Amid Surge In Microcephaly

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The man in the T-shirt is Paolo Sandoval, 42. His wife (seated, far right, in a white shirt) is Jessica Vivana Torres, 30. She's 15 weeks pregnant with their first child and came down with Zika three weeks ago. "I'm really worried about brain damage in the baby," says Sandoval, who listens intently as the ultrasound doctor describes the procedure. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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Nurith Aizenman/NPR

With Zika Looming, What's It Like At A Maternity Clinic In Colombia?

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Brazilian soldiers prepare for an operation to fight the Aedes aegypti mosquito, vector of the Zika, Dengue and Chikungunya viruses, in Sao Paulo, Brazil on February 3. The operation on Saturday will include 220,000 soldiers passing out pamphlets; they hope to reach 3 million homes. Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

Lourdes Garcia-Navarro performs with the Vila Isabel Samba School during Carnival in Rio de Janeiro. André Vieira for NPR hide caption

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André Vieira for NPR

In Rio, The Samba Parade Goes On Despite A Wardrobe Malfunction

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A city health worker and a Brazilian soldier point out potential breeding grounds for mosquitoes in the city of Recife. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Brazilians Have To Learn To Think Like A Mosquito

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Which house does a better job keeping mosquitoes away? In this model set up by health workers to help prevent the spread of Zika, the one on the left appears to have less standing water, which is a magnet for mosquitoes. Rafael Fabres for NPR hide caption

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Rafael Fabres for NPR

Carnival Gives Brazil Ideas About How To Fight Zika

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A patient at a Rio de Janeiro clinic has a blood sample taken to check for Zika and other viruses. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

How Much Harm Can The Zika Virus Really Do?

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Gleyse Kelly da Silva holds her daughter, Maria Giovanna, who was born with microcephaly. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Zika-Linked Brain Damage In Infants May Be 'Tip Of The Iceberg'

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Larvae of genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are pictured through a microscope viewfinder. The larvae will die before reaching adulthood. Nelson Almeida /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nelson Almeida /AFP/Getty Images

A researcher holds a container with female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. This species transmits the Zika virus. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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Andre Penner/AP

The Zika Virus Takes A Frightening Turn — And Raises Many Questions

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