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Protesters last month vent their anger over President Dilma Rousseff (left) moving to appoint her predecessor, Luis Inacio Lula da Silva, as her chief of staff — an action that would have shielded him from prosecution. A court blocked him from the post. Rousseff faces the possibility of impeachment while Lula is under investigation for corruption. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

With The Economy Crashing, Brazilians Turn On A Once-Popular President

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Teenagers sit on a new sign reading "Cidade Olimpica" (Olympic City) in Rio de Janeiro's port district last October. Ahead of this summer's Olympic Games, the port district is undergoing an urban renewal program. Ticket sales have been slow, and many Brazilians cite the poor state of the economy, which is in recession. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Brazil's Latest Headache: Ticket Sales Lag For Rio Olympics

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Two-month-old Lara, who was born with microcephaly, is examined by a neurologist at the Pedro I hospital in Campina Grande, Paraiba state, Brazil, on Feb. 12. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Brazilian Doctor Crafts System Hailed As 'Way Forward' For Combating Zika

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Nadja Bezerra carries her 4-month-old daughter, Alice, who was born with microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil. Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How To Fight Zika When Your Country Is In Trouble: Improvise

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A woman places flowers on a coffin during a protest against violence in Rio de Janeiro last October. Brazil's violence is at an all-time high, with nearly 60,000 murders a year. Silvia Izquierdo/AP hide caption

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Silvia Izquierdo/AP

Brazil Has Nearly 60,000 Murders, And It May Relax Gun Laws

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There are about 1,000 genetically engineered mosquitoes in each pot. Guilherme Trivellato of the biotech company Oxitec prepares to release them in Piracicaba, Brazil, in the hope of reducing the spread of Zika and other viruses. Catherine Osborn/for NPR hide caption

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Catherine Osborn/for NPR

How Could Releasing More Mosquitoes Help Fight Zika?

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Both President Dilma Rousseff and former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, shown here during his swearing-in ceremony as the chief of staff March 17, have been caught up in the wiretap firestorm. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

In Brazilian Officials' Taped Conversations, Women Hear Rampant Sexism

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Protesters used a sign to vent their anger over President Dilma Rousseff appointing her embattled predecessor, Luis Inacio Lula da Silva, as her chief of staff — a move that shields him from prosecution. Both Lula and Rousseff have been confronted with questions from a massive corruption investigation. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

An inflatable figure in the likeness of Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, former president of Brazil, is seen as demonstrators gather during a protest against current President Dilma Rousseff and the ruling Workers Party in Brasilia, Brazil, on Sunday. Hundreds of thousands of Brazilians gathered across the country on Sunday to protest political corruption and call for the impeachment of Rousseff. : Lula Marques/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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: Lula Marques/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Dr. Danielle Cruz attends to 4-month-old Davi Lucas Francisca da Paz, held by his mother, Eliane Francisca, in an examination room at the Institute of Integral Medicine Hospital in Recife, Brazil. Catherine Osborn/for NPR hide caption

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Catherine Osborn/for NPR

The Poignant Cry Of Babies With Birth Defects Linked to Zika

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