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A man performs yoga in the Babilonia favela overlooking Rio de Janeiro in 2014. The Brazilian government made a big push to impose order on the shantytowns in advance of the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics this summer. Babilonia was once considered a model, but violence has been on the rise in the run-up to the games. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

As Olympics Near, Violence Grips Rio's 'Pacified' Favelas

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Brazilians protest in front of the Legislative Assembly of Rio de Janeiro on Friday against an alleged gang rape that police say they are investigating. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brazil's new finance minister Henrique Meirelles (left) and acting President Michel Temer gesture during the Cabinet inauguration ceremony in Brazil's capital Brasilia, on Thursday. Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff was suspended earlier to face an impeachment trial. Andressa Anholete/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Teenagers sit on a new sign reading "Cidade Olimpica" (Olympic City) in Rio de Janeiro's port district last October. Ahead of this summer's Olympic Games, the port district is undergoing an urban renewal program. Ticket sales have been slow, and many Brazilians cite the poor state of the economy, which is in recession. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

President Dilma Rousseff was suspended from office by Brazil's Senate as part of impeachment proceedings. She will be tried by that same body and faces permanent removal from office. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

People supporting impeachment of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff demonstrate in front of Planalto Palace in Brasilia on Tuesday. Brazil's Senate is voting Wednesday on whether to impeach Rousseff, who is accused of using accounting tricks and unauthorized state loans to boost public spending during her 2014 re-election campaign. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vice President Temer Would Lead Brazil If The President Is Impeached

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Protesters last month vent their anger over President Dilma Rousseff (left) moving to appoint her predecessor, Luis Inacio Lula da Silva, as her chief of staff — an action that would have shielded him from prosecution. A court blocked him from the post. Rousseff faces the possibility of impeachment while Lula is under investigation for corruption. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

With The Economy Crashing, Brazilians Turn On A Once-Popular President

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Teenagers sit on a new sign reading "Cidade Olimpica" (Olympic City) in Rio de Janeiro's port district last October. Ahead of this summer's Olympic Games, the port district is undergoing an urban renewal program. Ticket sales have been slow, and many Brazilians cite the poor state of the economy, which is in recession. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Brazil's Latest Headache: Ticket Sales Lag For Rio Olympics

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Two-month-old Lara, who was born with microcephaly, is examined by a neurologist at the Pedro I hospital in Campina Grande, Paraiba state, Brazil, on Feb. 12. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Brazilian Doctor Crafts System Hailed As 'Way Forward' For Combating Zika

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Nadja Bezerra carries her 4-month-old daughter, Alice, who was born with microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil. Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How To Fight Zika When Your Country Is In Trouble: Improvise

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