Brazil Brazil

Mifeprex, formerly called RU-486, is the brand name of the abortion pill called mifepristone. Michelle Del Guercio hide caption

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Michelle Del Guercio

Has Zika Pushed More Women Toward Illegal Abortions?

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Brazilian physiotherapist Igor Simoes Andrade poses for a picture next to jaguar Juma as he takes part in the Olympic torch relay in Manaus, Brazil, on Monday. Marcio Melo/Reuters hide caption

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Marcio Melo/Reuters

Cleaners in Rio de Janeiro collect debris from Guanabara Bay that washed up onto the beach last December. The bay, which will host sailing events at the Olympics in August, is heavily polluted. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images

For Olympic Sailors And Fishermen Alike, Rio's Dirty Bay Sets Off Alarms

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People walk past graffiti art in the Providencia community of Rio, a favela that dates back to 1897. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Is The Risk Of Catching Zika Greater In Poor Neighborhoods?

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Yolande Mabika, a refugee and judo athlete from the Democratic Republic of Congo, stands outside her newly rented apartment in Rio de Janeiro. Mabika and fellow Congolese athlete Popole Misenga came to Brazil in 2013 to compete in a judo championship; they became refugees after their coach vanished with their passports and money. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

For The First Time, A Team Of Refugees Will Compete At The Olympics

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A man performs yoga in the Babilonia favela overlooking Rio de Janeiro in 2014. The Brazilian government made a big push to impose order on the shantytowns in advance of the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics this summer. Babilonia was once considered a model, but violence has been on the rise in the run-up to the games. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

As Olympics Near, Violence Grips Rio's 'Pacified' Favelas

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Brazilians protest in front of the Legislative Assembly of Rio de Janeiro on Friday against an alleged gang rape that police say they are investigating. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

Brazil's new finance minister Henrique Meirelles (left) and acting President Michel Temer gesture during the Cabinet inauguration ceremony in Brazil's capital Brasilia, on Thursday. Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff was suspended earlier to face an impeachment trial. Andressa Anholete/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Teenagers sit on a new sign reading "Cidade Olimpica" (Olympic City) in Rio de Janeiro's port district last October. Ahead of this summer's Olympic Games, the port district is undergoing an urban renewal program. Ticket sales have been slow, and many Brazilians cite the poor state of the economy, which is in recession. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

President Dilma Rousseff was suspended from office by Brazil's Senate as part of impeachment proceedings. She will be tried by that same body and faces permanent removal from office. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

People supporting impeachment of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff demonstrate in front of Planalto Palace in Brasilia on Tuesday. Brazil's Senate is voting Wednesday on whether to impeach Rousseff, who is accused of using accounting tricks and unauthorized state loans to boost public spending during her 2014 re-election campaign. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

Vice President Temer Would Lead Brazil If The President Is Impeached

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