Peru Peru

A Quechua woman tends to her clay oven in her outdoor kitchen on the road to the Sillustani archaeological site in Puno, Peru. The stone table is laid with a collection of potatoes and other tubers, as well as homemade cheese and bread. Tony Dunnell hide caption

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Tony Dunnell

Agustin Mayta Condori shows a sick alpaca, which he predicted would die the next day because of subfreezing temperatures in the southern Andes in Peru. Thousands of alpacas have died in the region. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

A woman breast-feeds her child as she waits to donate milk to a milk bank in Lima. The donations are used for babies whose mothers can't provide breast milk. Ernesto Benavides /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides /AFP/Getty Images

The Inca were innovators in agriculture as well as engineering. Terracing like this, on a steep hillside in Peru's Colca Canyon, helped them grow food. Doug McMains/Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian hide caption

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Doug McMains/Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

For Inca Road Builders, Extreme Terrain Was No Obstacle

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Maria Nieves Nashnato Upari and Jose Manuel Huaymacari Tamani are teaching Kukama to children in hopes of keeping their "maternal language" alive. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

If your neighbors are getting on your nerves, here's what you'd say in Kukama: "They're living like dogs: one minute laughing, the next minute shouting, the next minute fighting."

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Peru's alpacas are blessed once a year, during rainy season. The blessing declares: "Let there be a great abundance of alpacas, so that the alpacas should be like the condor and appear to fly from one mountain to another." Courtesy of the Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco hide caption

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Courtesy of the Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco

Standing in their backyard in Cochas Grande, Peru, Katya and Blanca Cantos, hold the fruit of their labor. The gourd at left shows scenes from a potato harvest. The just-started gourd at right will tell the story of an ancestor's epic trek. Josh Cogan/Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archive, Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Josh Cogan/Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archive, Smithsonian Institution