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Peruvian authorities are pursuing charges against a truck driver who damaged the ancient lines at Nazca on Saturday. Here, an aerial view of the geoglyph known as the Guarango Tree at the site in 2014. Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images

Former President Alberto Fujimori waves to supporters Thursday as he is wheeled out of a hospital, where he received his Christmas Eve pardon from President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski. Luka Gonzales/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luka Gonzales/AFP/Getty Images

A Quechua woman tends to her clay oven in her outdoor kitchen on the road to the Sillustani archaeological site in Puno, Peru. The stone table is laid with a collection of potatoes and other tubers, as well as homemade cheese and bread. Tony Dunnell hide caption

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Tony Dunnell

Agustin Mayta Condori shows a sick alpaca, which he predicted would die the next day because of subfreezing temperatures in the southern Andes in Peru. Thousands of alpacas have died in the region. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

A woman breast-feeds her child as she waits to donate milk to a milk bank in Lima. The donations are used for babies whose mothers can't provide breast milk. Ernesto Benavides /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides /AFP/Getty Images

The Inca were innovators in agriculture as well as engineering. Terracing like this, on a steep hillside in Peru's Colca Canyon, helped them grow food. Doug McMains/Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian hide caption

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Doug McMains/Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

For Inca Road Builders, Extreme Terrain Was No Obstacle

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Maria Nieves Nashnato Upari and Jose Manuel Huaymacari Tamani are teaching Kukama to children in hopes of keeping their "maternal language" alive. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

If your neighbors are getting on your nerves, here's what you'd say in Kukama: "They're living like dogs: one minute laughing, the next minute shouting, the next minute fighting."

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