Peru Peru

Mixed ceviche from Peru: The Cookbook. Courtesy of Phaidon Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Phaidon Press

A Tome For Peruvian Food, By Its Most Acclaimed Ambassador

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Jenny Tenorio Gallegos, 35, in Lima, Peru, is being treated for drug-resistant TB. The treatment lasts two years and may rob her of her hearing. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

She's Got One Of The Toughest Diseases To Cure. And She's Hopeful

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A man and his drone: Carlos Casteneda of the Amazon Basin Conservation Association prepares to launch one of his plastic foam planes. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Eyes In The Sky: Foam Drones Keep Watch On Rain Forest Trees

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Researchers meet participants: (from left) investigator Jose Luis Roca; Dr. Ernesto Ortiz; study participants Rainer Leon and his mother, Rina Leon Chanbilla; and nurse Jennifer Rampas. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

They're Going Door To Door In The Amazon To See Why People Get Sick

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This aerial view shows the effects of gold mining on Peru's rain forest. Courtesy of Gregory Asner, Carnegie Institution for Science hide caption

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Courtesy of Gregory Asner, Carnegie Institution for Science

Who Did This To Peru's Jungle?

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Cholita, an Andean bear, was abused in a circus in Peru and is now in a small zoo. An animal welfare group has now received permission to take Cholita to a wildlife sanctuary in Colorado, along with more than 30 former circus lions. Courtesy of Animal Defenders International hide caption

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Courtesy of Animal Defenders International

Cholita, An Abused Bear In Peru, Gets A New Home In Colorado

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A miner holds a nugget of mercury mixed with gold. The mercury is used to extract gold from river sludge. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

Going For The Gold Sends Mercury Down The River

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Greenpeace activists stand next to massive cloth letters next to the hummingbird geoglyph at Peru's sacred Nazca lines. The Peruvian government is pursuing criminal charges against the activists. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

In Peru's annual Blood Festival, a condor is tied to the back of a bull and tries to gouge its eyes, while the bull attempts to shake off the giant bird. The event is popular in many parts of the country, but conservationists say this threatens a bird already at risk. Mollie Bloudoff-Indelicato for NPR hide caption

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Mollie Bloudoff-Indelicato for NPR