Baltimore Baltimore

Southerland says she dreams about buying a home in Bolton Hill, where it's quiet and culturally diverse. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

In Baltimore, The Gap Between White And Black Homeownership Persists

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Former Baltimore Police Commissioner Darryl De Sousa resigned on Tuesday. In charges last filed last week, federal prosecutors said he "willfully" failed to file tax returns for 2013, 2014 and 2015. Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Fire shoots out from a Baltimore store on Gay Street as looting erupted in a five-block business section in Baltimore on April 6, 1968. Police sealed off the area. AP hide caption

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AP

50 Years Ago Baltimore Burned. The Same Issues Set It Aflame In 2015

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Adnan Syed, subject of the podcast Serial, is escorted from a courthouse in February 2016. An appellate court has upheld a previous decision to vacate Syed's 2000 conviction Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

'Serial' Subject Adnan Syed Deserves A New Trial, Appeals Court Rules

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DMG Foods, the Salvation Army's first supermarket, offers discount groceries to nutritional assistance beneficiaries and anyone else who walks through the door. dmgfoods.org hide caption

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dmgfoods.org

Salvation Army Opens Its First-Ever Supermarket, In Baltimore

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Jurors are deliberating in the corruption trial of a Baltimore Police Department unit that witnesses say was rife with crime and cover-ups. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

An overdose rescue kit handed out at an overdose prevention class this summer in New York City includes an injectable form of the drug naloxone. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Counting The Heavy Cost Of Care In The Age Of Opioids

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Baltimore removed four statues with Confederate ties on Aug. 16 under the cover of darkness, in a five-hour operation ordered by Mayor Catherine Pugh. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Merrit Kennedy/NPR

Baltimore Took Down Confederate Monuments. Now It Has To Decide What To Do With Them

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Baltimore city workers remove graffiti from the pedestal where a statue dedicated to Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson stood on Wednesday. The City of Baltimore removed four statues celebrating confederate heroes from city parks overnight, following the weekend's violence in Charlottesville, Va. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Andrea Towson used heroin for more than three decades. After a near-death experience with fentanyl, she sought help. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

'That Fentanyl — That's Death': A Story Of Recovery In Baltimore

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#19 Eric Dorsey, 41 y/o 2/5/16 at 8:54am 3900 Penhurst Ave. This image is part of artist Amy Berbert's series Stains on the Sidewalk, where she photographs the space where someone was killed in Baltimore on the one year anniversary of their death. Courtesy of Amy Berbert hide caption

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Courtesy of Amy Berbert

'Stains On The Sidewalk': Photographer Remembers Year Of Murders In Baltimore

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Charles Barkley and executive producer Dan Partland speak during the American Race Press Luncheon in May in New York City. Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Catalina Rodriguez-Lima runs a city office whose mission is to attract new immigrants to Baltimore, a strategy for reversing decades of population decline. Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido

Samirah Franklin, 19, is lead organizer of the Baltimore Youth Organizing Project. She lives in West Baltimore, near where the violence and looting broke out after Freddie Gray's funeral two years ago. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

2 Years After Unrest, Baltimore's Youth Are 'Still Fighting For The Basics'

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Jose Cedillo, a 41-year-old former restaurant worker from Honduras, struggles to get health care for his diabetes. He often finds himself without a job and homeless on the streets of Baltimore. Doug Kapustin/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Doug Kapustin/Kaiser Health News

When Jerry Greeff (left) wanted to retire, he donated his auto shop to a nonprofit. Vernon Shaw was Greeff's right-hand man and was a big part of the reason Greeff couldn't just let the business go. By donating the business, Greeff made sure Shaw and his other employees could keep their jobs. Mary Rose Madden/WYPR hide caption

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Mary Rose Madden/WYPR

Lots Of People Donate Their Cars, But This Owner Donated His Auto Repair Shop

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Attorney General Loretta Lynch (right), speaks during a joint news conference to announce the Baltimore Police Department's commitment to a sweeping overhaul of its practices under a court-enforceable agreement with the federal government on Thursday. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore police spokesman T.J. Smith said a school bus rear-ended a car early Tuesday morning, then struck a pillar at a cemetery and veered into oncoming traffic, smashing into a Maryland Transit Administration bus on the driver's side. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP