Texas Texas

Abortion rights activists celebrate outside the U.S. Supreme Court Monday for a ruling in a case over a Texas law that places restrictions on abortion clinics. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Marovich/Getty Images

Attorney Bert Rein speaks to the media while standing with plaintiff Abigail Noel Fisher after the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in her case in 2012 in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Medical residents training to be OB-GYNs in Texas don't have many places where they can learn how to perform abortions. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

Can Doctors Learn To Perform Abortions Without Doing One?

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Dr. Bernard Rosenfeld, 74, has not been able to find a successor to lead his abortion practice in Houston. He says younger doctors don't want to deal with the politics and protesters. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

Politics Makes Abortion Training In Texas Difficult

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Luis Alberto de la Rosa says he sells lots of misoprostol, a drug used in abortions and in ulcer treatment, to women from Texas who come to his Miramar Pharmacy in Nuevo Progreso, Mexico. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Legal Medical Abortions Are Up In Texas, But So Are DIY Pills From Mexico

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A building on Fort Hood Army Base in Fort Hood, Texas, is seen in this 2014 photo. Rescue crews were searching for four soldiers missing after a training accident on Thursday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Alejandra Ventura lifts her dog out of the water after the Brazos River topped its banks and flooded a mobile home park in Richmond, Texas, on Tuesday. Daniel Kramer/Reuters hide caption

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Daniel Kramer/Reuters

Inundated With Rain, Texas Residents Brace For More This Week

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A new sticker designates a gender neutral bathroom at a high school in Seattle. President Obama's directive ordering schools to accommodate transgender students has been controversial in some places, leading 11 states to file a lawsuit against the Obama administration in response. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Emilio Navaira during the 4th Annual Latin Grammy Awards in Miami in 2003. The musician has died at the age of 53. Michael Caulfield Archive/WireImage/GettyImages hide caption

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Michael Caulfield Archive/WireImage/GettyImages

A student boards a Fort Worth Independent School bus in Texas in 2009. The new district superintendent is facing criticism for issuing guidelines on supporting transgender students. Tony Gutierrez/AP hide caption

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Tony Gutierrez/AP

Time is running out for a conservative to launch a national third-party presidential campaign, as Ross Perot did in 1992. Doug Mills/AP hide caption

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Doug Mills/AP

Is It Too Late For A Third-Party Presidential Candidate To Run?

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Detained immigrant children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes County Residential Center, in Karnes City, Texas, a temporary home for immigrant women and children detained at the border. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP