Texas Texas

The tarantula hawk, undoubtedly eyeing its next hapless eight-legged prey. Fred Holley/Flickr hide caption

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Fred Holley/Flickr

For This Tarantula-Killing Wasp, Dinner's A Meal Best Served Living

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Mary Helen Flores (center) is the founder of Citizens Against Voter Abuse. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

In Rio Grande Valley, Some Campaign Workers Are Paid To Harvest Votes

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Jonathan Treviño poses in front of a drug bust. Courtesy of Jonathan Treviño hide caption

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Courtesy of Jonathan Treviño

With Corruption Rampant, Good Cops Go Bad In Texas' Rio Grande Valley

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Jonathan Treviño shows seized contraband. The former police narcotics squad leader is currently serving 17 years in prison for reselling narcotics back to drug dealers. Courtesy of Jonathan Treviño hide caption

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Courtesy of Jonathan Treviño

Corruption On The Border: Dismantling Misconduct In The Rio Grande Valley

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The U.S. Supreme Court gave a reprieve to Texas clinics that provide abortion services. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Supreme Court Reprieve Lets 10 Texas Abortion Clinics Stay Open For Now

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Melissa Mathis holds a container of freeze-dried placenta capsules. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

Texas Defends A Woman's Right To Take Her Placenta Home

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On July 9, 2013, opponents and supporters of a bill to put restrictions on abortion hold signs near a news conference outside the Texas Capitol in Austin. The bill was passed, but has been battled in the courts for two years; now, the law is set to go into effect July 1. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Texas Abortion Curbs Go Into Effect Soon, Unless Supreme Court Acts

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People gather at a church in Gilbert, Ariz., for an Easter sunrise service in 2010. The town passed a law to regulate signs a church in town was temporarily posting to provide event directions, but the Supreme Court on Thursday declared those rules unconstitutional. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Justices Give Officials More Say On Cars' Plates, Less On Roadside Signs

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