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Trucks make their way through floodwaters on a road leading to Arkema Inc. in Crosby, Texas, Wednesday. Chemicals at the plant are in danger of exploding because refrigeration is out owing to Hurricane Harvey. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A screenshot from Mayor Derrick Harvey's Facebook livestream on Wednesday. "We got some water, y'all. Harvey wasn't playing," the Mayor says in a video that shows knee-deep water inside his house. Mayor Derrick Harvey/Facebook hide caption

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Mayor Derrick Harvey/Facebook

A refinery in Deer Park, Texas, in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Some residents and environment groups are worried about toxic chemicals that could be emitted into the air if there's any damage. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Flooded Texas Chemical Plants Raise Concerns About Toxic Emissions

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People walk through floodwaters on Telephone Road in Houston on Sunday after 2 feet of rain from Hurricane Harvey pummeled the Gulf Coast. Thomas B. Shea/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas B. Shea/AFP/Getty Images

Rain is blown past palm trees as Hurricane Harvey makes landfall Friday in Corpus Christi, Texas. Harvey steered into the Texas coast with the potential for up to 3 feet of rain, 125 mph winds and 12-foot storm surges. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

In her second ruling on the Texas Senate Bill, U.S. District Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos said changes made to 2011 voter ID law did not "fully ameliorate" its "discriminatory intent." LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announces a special session of the Texas Legislature on June 6. This Tuesday, that special session closed, without the passage of a so-called bathroom bill that Abbott had sought. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Texas House Speaker Joe Straus at the state Capitol in April 2017. Straus opposes efforts by other powerful Republicans to pass a 'bathroom bill' that would affect transgender people. Martin do Nascimento/KUT hide caption

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Martin do Nascimento/KUT

Jennifer Ramirez and 14 other young women wearing quinceañera dresses protested on the south steps of the Texas State Capitol in Austin on Wednesday. They protested SB4, an immigration enforcement law. Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News hide caption

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Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

Shawn Sheehan, Oklahoma's 2016 Teacher of the Year, sits in his classroom one last time before moving to Texas for better pay. Emily Wendler/KOSU hide caption

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Emily Wendler/KOSU

Teacher Of The Year In Oklahoma Moves To Texas For The Money

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