Texas Texas
Stories About

Texas

Clockwise from top left: Flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Texas. A victim of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. Rescuers search for survivors after the earthquake in Mexico. Monsoon flooding in India. Top Left: Emily Kask Top Right: Carolyn Cole Bottom Left: Diptendu Dutta Bottom Right: Pedro Pardo/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Top Left: Emily Kask Top Right: Carolyn Cole Bottom Left: Diptendu Dutta Bottom Right: Pedro Pardo/Getty Images

What The Pileup Of U.S. Disasters Means For The World

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/554291950/559215351" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amy Walters from Copperas Cove, Texas, with a horse she rode as she rounded up lost cattle and brought them to the makeshift shelter in Beaumont, Texas. Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio

From Pets To Livestock, Lost Animals Rounded Up In Beaumont's Makeshift Shelter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/548433503/548505871" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Andrew White helps a neighbor — and a dog — get to safety after their street was flooded by Hurricane Harvey. Scott Olson /Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson /Getty Images

A Bipartisan Bill Helped Save Pets From Harvey, And Maybe Their Humans Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547972616/548076117" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Trucks make their way through floodwaters on a road leading to Arkema Inc. in Crosby, Texas, Wednesday. Chemicals at the plant are in danger of exploding because refrigeration is out owing to Hurricane Harvey. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A screenshot from Mayor Derrick Harvey's Facebook livestream on Wednesday. "We got some water, y'all. Harvey wasn't playing," the Mayor says in a video that shows knee-deep water inside his house. Mayor Derrick Harvey/Facebook hide caption

toggle caption
Mayor Derrick Harvey/Facebook

A refinery in Deer Park, Texas, in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Some residents and environment groups are worried about toxic chemicals that could be emitted into the air if there's any damage. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Flooded Texas Chemical Plants Raise Concerns About Toxic Emissions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547219385/547219386" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People walk through floodwaters on Telephone Road in Houston on Sunday after 2 feet of rain from Hurricane Harvey pummeled the Gulf Coast. Thomas B. Shea/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas B. Shea/AFP/Getty Images

Rain is blown past palm trees as Hurricane Harvey makes landfall Friday in Corpus Christi, Texas. Harvey steered into the Texas coast with the potential for up to 3 feet of rain, 125 mph winds and 12-foot storm surges. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP