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The University of Texas-Austin announced Tuesday it is offering full tuition scholarships to in-state undergraduates whose families make $65,000 or less a year. Jon Herskovitz/Reuters hide caption

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Jon Herskovitz/Reuters

A search team looks for a 2-year-old girl who went missing in the Rio Grande near the border city of Del Rio, Texas. U.S. Customs and Border Protection hide caption

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, speaks alongside members of the Hispanic Caucus after touring the Border Patrol station in Clint, Texas, on Monday. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

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Cedar Attanasio/AP

U.S. citizens use ropes to cross the Rio Grande from San Antonio del Bravo, Mexico, into Candelaria, Texas. U.S. citizens depend on the free health clinic in San Antonio del Bravo. Lorne Matalon for NPR hide caption

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Lorne Matalon for NPR

In Rural West Texas, Illegal Border Crossings Are Routine For U.S. Citizens

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Drivers line up in the border city of Juárez in Mexico's Chihuahua state, as they attempt to cross the border at El Paso, Texas. The Guatemalan consul has confirmed that a Guatemalan boy apprehended with his mother last month had died Tuesday night. Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images

Cellphone footage shot by Sandra Bland and made public Monday night shows her encounter with state Trooper Brian Encinia that led to her arrest in 2015. Days later, Bland was found dead in her jail cell. Investigative Network/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Investigative Network/Screenshot by NPR

Mike Hollinger of IBM joined a group of business leaders at a news conference on the steps of the capitol in Austin, Texas. The business leaders oppose the so-called religious refusal laws currently under consideration in the Texas legislature. Susan Risdon/Red Media Group hide caption

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Susan Risdon/Red Media Group

Business Leaders Oppose 'License To Discriminate' Against LGBT Texans

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Rancher Hugh Fitzsimons stands next to a pile of debris migrants left behind once they crossed into the United States. Veronica G. Cardenas/Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Veronica G. Cardenas/Texas Public Radio

Immigration and Customs Enforcement raided a cellphone repair company in Texas on Wednesday. Buses left the site a few hours after the raid began, presumably with some of the 280 workers accused of being in the country without proper documentation. Anthony Cave/KERA hide caption

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Anthony Cave/KERA

Eloisa Tamez of El Calaboz, Texas, walks along the border wall in her backyard. She took the government to court over surveying her land and over the compensation she received for the land needed for border wall construction. Reynaldo Leanos Jr./Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Reynaldo Leanos Jr./Texas Public Radio

Rio Grande Valley Landowners Plan To Fight Border Wall Expansion

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The Nokona baseball glove factory in the small town of Nocona, Texas, is one of the last remaining baseball glove factories in the U.S. Bill Zeeble/KERA hide caption

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Bill Zeeble/KERA

A Small Town In Texas Is Home To One Of The Last Baseball Glove Factories In The U.S.

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Children of Mexican immigrants wait to receive a free health checkup inside a mobile clinic at the Mexican Consulate in Denver, Colo., in 2009. The Trump administration wants to ratchet up scrutiny of the use of social services by immigrants. That's already led some worried parents to avoid family health care. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Fear Of Deportation Or Green Card Denial Deters Some Parents From Getting Kids Care

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