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Syrians bury Syrian Democratic Forces fighters killed while battling Turkish forces in the town of Qamishli on Saturday. Turkey's military says it has captured a key Syrian border town as its offensive against Kurdish fighters presses on. Baderkhan Ahmad/AP hide caption

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Baderkhan Ahmad/AP

Smoke rises from the Syrian town of Ras al-Ain on Friday amid Turkey's military operation against Kurdish forces. Ozan Kose/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ozan Kose/AFP via Getty Images

Pentagon Says U.S. Troop Position In Syria Came Under Fire From Turkish Incursion

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In this photo taken from the Turkish side of the border between Turkey and Syria, smoke billows from a fire inside Syria during bombardment by Turkish forces on Wednesday. Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images

Syrian National Army forces are dispatched to the Manbij front line near Aleppo ahead of Turkey's planned operation in northern Syria, on Tuesday. Bekir Kasim/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Bekir Kasim/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

U.S. allies in the Syrian Democratic Forces say the White House's decision to pull troops from the Syria-Turkey border has left them without hope. Here, a U.S. soldier is seen during a joint patrol with Turkish troops on Friday. Staff Sgt. Andrew Goedl/U.S. Army/Operation Inherent Resolve hide caption

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Staff Sgt. Andrew Goedl/U.S. Army/Operation Inherent Resolve

U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) fighters pose for a photo in Baghouz, Syria, in March after the SDF declared the area free of Islamic State militants. Maya Alleruzzo/AP hide caption

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Maya Alleruzzo/AP

Omar Alshogre, a Syrian refugee who was tortured as a political prisoner in Syria, now lives in Sweden. He has framed photos of men who he says tortured him that he keeps upside down. Axel Öberg for NPR hide caption

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Axel Öberg for NPR

Journalist and filmmaker Waad al-Kateab filmed the documentary For Sama in her hometown of Aleppo, Syria. "You could be killed at any moment," Kateab says. You are always "expecting something worse." For Sama will be in theaters July 26 and distributed by Frontline and PBS. PBS hide caption

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PBS

A New Mother Stays In Syria: 'For Sama' Is The Movie She Made For Her Baby

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A Syrian boy walks among demolished shelters at a refugee camp in the northeastern Lebanese town of Arsal, in Lebanon's Bekaa valley, on June 10. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images

Forced To Demolish Their Own Homes, Syrian Refugees In Lebanon Seek New Shelter

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Jeelan, 11, the day after being rescued from an ISIS family who had held her captive for the past two years. She says she doesn't remember her Yazidi family. "I want to go back to Um Ali," she says, referring to the Iraqi woman who had been pretending to be her mother in a detention camp for ISIS families. "Um Ali is my real family." Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'I Want To Go Back': The Yazidi Girls Who Did Not Want To Be Rescued From ISIS

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Caregiver Fajriya Khaled holds a child at an orphanage in northeastern Syria, home to 41 children of Yazidi mothers and ISIS fathers. The Yazidi community in Iraq forces the women to leave their children behind if they want to return home. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

In Syria, An Orphanage Cares For Children Born To Yazidi Mothers Enslaved By ISIS

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The People's Defense Court in the Rojava district of northeast Syria. Judges here have been holding trials of thousands of ISIS fighters. The Kurdish-led region broke from Syrian government control in 2012 and has developed its own justice system that it says adheres to Western standards of human rights. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'Revenge Is For The Weak': Kurdish Courts In Northeastern Syria Take On ISIS Cases

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Women sit on the floor as they wait in a clinic at the al-Hol detention camp. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Misery Grows At Syrian Camp Holding ISIS Family Members

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Ibrahim, 2, in northeastern Syria a few hours after his freed Yazidi mother returned to Iraq without him. Ibrahim's father was an ISIS fighter. Although his mother wanted to take him home, the Yazidis do not allow children of ISIS fathers to live with the community. Iraqi law considers the children Muslim rather than Yazidi. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Freed From ISIS, Yazidi Mothers Face Wrenching Choice: Abandon Kids Or Never Go Home

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Two Syrian refugees, Narwal Alakayleh (left) and Lina AlAlssantin (right), prepare for a pop-up dinner of Levantine food at Newcomer Kitchen. Jessica Wright hide caption

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Jessica Wright

Women carry children near the al-Hol camp in Syria's Kurdish-majority region of Rojava. The camp is filled with more than 72,000 people — most of them women and children who came out of the last ISIS-held territory. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'We Pray For The Caliphate To Return': ISIS Families Crowd Into Syrian Camps

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