Syria Syria

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks in Ankara during the funeral prayers for Sgt. Musa Ozalkan, the first Turkish soldier to be killed in Turkey's cross-border "Operation Olive Branch" in northern Syria, on Tuesday. Kayhan Ozer/AP hide caption

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Kayhan Ozer/AP

A man rides through Raqqa, Syria, on his motorbike. Michele Kelemen/NPR hide caption

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Michele Kelemen/NPR

'Immediate Needs' In Syria After ISIS: USAID Chief Visits Devastated Raqqa

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A Yazidi tomb in a village in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Many families were displaced when ISIS killed hundreds of men and kidnapped thousands of women and children. More than 3,000 Yazidis are still missing. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

This Man Has Freed Hundreds Of Yazidis Captured By ISIS. Thousands Remain Missing

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Looking at the damage in the aftermath of an explosion at in a rebel-held area of the northwestern Syrian city of Idlib on Monday. Omar Haj Kadour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Haj Kadour/AFP/Getty Images

In "Gardens Speak," visitors lie in graves 10 at a time, listening to recorded stories of those killed in the Syrian uprising. Tania El Khoury/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Tania El Khoury/Courtesy of the artist

Stories Of Syria's Uprising, And Its Backyard Funerals, In 'Gardens Speak'

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U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Paul Funk (left), and Iraqi Maj. Gen. Najm Abdullah al-Jibouri, walk through a busy market in Mosul, Iraq, on Oct. 4. U.S. forces in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan have been increasing this year under President Trump, going from about 18,000 at the beginning of the year to 26,000 recently, according to Pentagon figures. Spc. Avery Howard/AP hide caption

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Spc. Avery Howard/AP

The U.S. has been arming the Kurds through the umbrella group known as the Syrian Democratic Forces, but the aid has long been a thorn in U.S.-Turkey relations. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Mixed Grill with beef, lamb and chicken. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In 'Our Syria' Cookbook, Women Share Stories, Safeguard A Scattered Cuisine

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A member of the Syrian Democratic Forces, a group allied with the United States, walks through debris in Raqqa, Syria, formerly the de facto capital of Islamic State. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images

Pentagon Says It's Staying In Syria, Even Though ISIS Appears Defeated

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The sheep brain sandwich at Syrjeia, a legendary sandwich shop in Aleppo. Served with tomatoes, Syrian pickles and lemon juice with garlic, it was the stuff of legend and longing for locals and visitors alike. But did it – and Syrjeia — survive the Syrian civil war? Dalia Mortada/Courtesy of Sporkful hide caption

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Dalia Mortada/Courtesy of Sporkful