Syria Syria

A portrait of Syrian President Bashar Assad is mounted on a wall in Damascus on March 3. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pavel Golovkin/AP

For Foreign Journalists, A Rare Invitation To Damascus

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/500034891/500034892" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marsha Lewis, a semi-retired teacher, is one of the volunteers helping Syrian refugee Fadi al-Asmi, standing in the kitchen of Hartford's City Steam Brewery. Asmi, who co-owned a pastry shop in Damascus, now makes desserts at this Hartford cafe. Courtesy of Richard Groothuis hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Richard Groothuis

For Syrian Refugees In Connecticut, A Helping Hand From Private Volunteers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499509208/499952581" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thousands of Haitians were promised homes by aid groups like the American Red Cross in the wake of the earthquake in 2010. Instead, many were given temporary shelters without bathrooms, kitchens or running water. Marie Arago for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Marie Arago for NPR

Iraqi forces raise a flag after retaking Bartella, a town nine miles outside Mosul, Iraq, on Friday. Iraq's army, backed by U.S. air power, began an offensive this week to retake Mosul, the last city in Iraq controlled by the Islamic State. Some smaller towns and villages were retaken this week, but the Iraqis have not yet reached Mosul. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Khalid Mohammed/AP

Wounded rebel fighters sit in the back of an ambulance in Aleppo on Thursday. The Syrian government and its Russian allies declared a pause in the fighting and urged rebels to leave the eastern part of the city, but clashes broke out Thursday. George Ourfalian /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
George Ourfalian /AFP/Getty Images

The Stark Choice In Aleppo: Flee Or Face More Attacks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498710689/498736865" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

For years Devi Lockwood avoided learning how to cook. Now, she makes dolmades. The leaves for these stuffed grape leaves came from a vine on a friend's farm in New Zealand. Devi Lockwood for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Devi Lockwood for NPR

People walk past a replica of an ancient statue of a human-headed winged bull from Nimrud, Iraq, destroyed by the Islamic State. It's part of an exhibition called "Rising from Destruction" at Rome's Colosseum. Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

Replicas Of Artifacts Destroyed By ISIS 'Rising From Destruction' In Rome

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/497350345/497350346" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Syrian medical worker inspects the damage at the site of a medical facility after it was reportedly hit by Syrian regime barrel bombs on Oct. 1 in Aleppo's rebel-held neighborhood of al-Sakhour. Fewer than 30 doctors remain in the besieged city. Thaer Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thaer Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images

Eastern Aleppo's Only Ophthalmologist Sees Ravages Of Syria's War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/496984850/496984851" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Smoke rises after aircraft belonging to the Russian army bombed a residential area in the Darat Izza neighborhood of Aleppo on Tuesday. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Why The Battle For Aleppo Is So Important

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/496543697/496592360" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Syrian volunteers carry an injured person after pro-government forces struck the rebel-held neighborhood of Heluk in Aleppo Friday. Thaer Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thaer Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images

Ibrahim Halil Dudu is a master tailor. He's also a Syrian refugee living in Ontario, and when the bride next door's zipper broke, he came to the rescue. Lindsay Coulter/Lindsay Coulter Photography hide caption

toggle caption
Lindsay Coulter/Lindsay Coulter Photography

An Act Of Kindness, From One Immigrant To Another

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/496134681/496196048" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marcell Shehwaro, 32, is the executive director of Kesh Malek, a Syrian group that runs schools in opposition-held areas of Aleppo. The unofficial schools hold classes in basements to protect the children, who don't go outside to play because of the the risk of being hit by bombs or ground fire. She was recently at the United Nations, lobbying world leaders to stop the attacks on Aleppo. Neil Hall/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Neil Hall/Reuters