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Firefighters combat a blaze on April 29, after regime helicopters targeted a medical center in an opposition-controlled region of Aleppo, Syria. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

A Cease-Fire In Name Alone

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Ahmed Darwish appears in a police station in Rumeilan, northern Syria, after being captured by Kurdish fighters as he was running away from a battle. He was wounded in a coalition airstrike in support of anti-ISIS forces. "There was camaraderie, friendship, like a brotherhood between us," he says of his time in ISIS. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

Joining ISIS: It's Not Always For Reasons You Might Assume

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"I never imagined I would be in this position, doing this kind of work," says Raed Al Saleh, 33, of his job as the head of the Syrian Civil Defense. "But these are the circumstances." Courtesy of The Syria Campaign hide caption

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Courtesy of The Syria Campaign

A Wednesday night airstrike at a hospital in Aleppo, Syria, killed more than a dozen people. Beha el Halebi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Beha el Halebi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Hospital Destroyed In Deadly Aleppo Airstrike, Doctors Without Borders Says

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A member of the Kurdish internal security forces (known as the Asayish) inspects the Alaya prison in the northeastern Syrian city of Qamishli on April 22. Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP/Getty Images

Syrian Raed Saleh came to Washington to receive an award for his rescue work in his homeland. However, he was turned back at Dulles International Airport outside Washington. No reason was given. In his honor, those attending the Tuesday evening banquet wore white helmets, a symbol of his group, Syria Civil Defense. Courtesy of Relief International hide caption

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Courtesy of Relief International

A Syrian Lands In The U.S. For An Award, Only To Be Turned Back

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Syrian President Bashar Assad, flanked by his wife, Asma (left), casts his ballot in the parliamentary elections Wednesday in Damascus, Syria, in a photo released on the official Facebook page of Syrian presidency. AP hide caption

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AP

A general view shows the remains of the entrance to the iconic Temple of Bel this week after Syrian government troops recaptured the UNESCO world heritage site from ISIS militants. Maher Al Mounes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maher Al Mounes/AFP/Getty Images

An Assyrian Christian woman prays at a church service in Tell Tamer, Syria. The service is to remember members of the community killed after about 300 people were taken captive by ISIS in March 2015. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

In Syria, Assyrian Christians Cling On After ISIS Onslaught

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Manaf Ibrahim takes a break from making sandwiches in a small town close to an airstrip he believes the U.S. is using to supply its advisers on the ground in eastern Syria. Alice Fordham /NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham /NPR

A Remote Syrian Airstrip Hints At A Growing American Military Role

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U.S.-backed forces recently pushed out the Islamic State in the northeastern Syrian town of Shadadi. They now face the challenge of running the town. So far, few people have been allowed back to amid fears that ISIS infiltrators could return. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

After Pushing ISIS Out Of Town, Can U.S.-Backed Forces Govern It?

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