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A Syrian boy walks among demolished shelters at a refugee camp in the northeastern Lebanese town of Arsal, in Lebanon's Bekaa valley, on June 10. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images

Forced To Demolish Their Own Homes, Syrian Refugees In Lebanon Seek New Shelter

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Jeelan, 11, the day after being rescued from an ISIS family who had held her captive for the past two years. She says she doesn't remember her Yazidi family. "I want to go back to Um Ali," she says, referring to the Iraqi woman who had been pretending to be her mother in a detention camp for ISIS families. "Um Ali is my real family." Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'I Want To Go Back': The Yazidi Girls Who Did Not Want To Be Rescued From ISIS

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Caregiver Fajriya Khaled holds a child at an orphanage in northeastern Syria, home to 41 children of Yazidi mothers and ISIS fathers. The Yazidi community in Iraq forces the women to leave their children behind if they want to return home. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

In Syria, An Orphanage Cares For Children Born To Yazidi Mothers Enslaved By ISIS

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The People's Defense Court in the Rojava district of northeast Syria. Judges here have been holding trials of thousands of ISIS fighters. The Kurdish-led region broke from Syrian government control in 2012 and has developed its own justice system that it says adheres to Western standards of human rights. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

'Revenge Is For The Weak': Kurdish Courts In Northeastern Syria Take On ISIS Cases

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Women sit on the floor as they wait in a clinic at the al-Hol detention camp. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Misery Grows At Syrian Camp Holding ISIS Family Members

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Ibrahim, 2, in northeastern Syria a few hours after his freed Yazidi mother returned to Iraq without him. Ibrahim's father was an ISIS fighter. Although his mother wanted to take him home, the Yazidis do not allow children of ISIS fathers to live with the community. Iraqi law considers the children Muslim rather than Yazidi. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Freed From ISIS, Yazidi Mothers Face Wrenching Choice: Abandon Kids Or Never Go Home

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Two Syrian refugees, Narwal Alakayleh (left) and Lina AlAlssantin (right), prepare for a pop-up dinner of Levantine food at Newcomer Kitchen. Jessica Wright hide caption

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Jessica Wright

Women carry children near the al-Hol camp in Syria's Kurdish-majority region of Rojava. The camp is filled with more than 72,000 people — most of them women and children who came out of the last ISIS-held territory. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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'We Pray For The Caliphate To Return': ISIS Families Crowd Into Syrian Camps

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President Trump signs a proclamation at the White House on Monday officially recognizing Israel's sovereignty over the Golan Heights, with Israeli Prime Minister (center-right) among the officials looking on. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP