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Inspektor Jan Gieber of Austrian police shows the inside of the large van outside the police station in Braunau, Upper Austria, on Sunday, where the children were found among 26 migrants trying to reach Europe. Daniel Scharinger/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Daniel Scharinger/EPA/Landov

Migrants from Africa receive instruction in French in the port city of Calais. Some 3,000 migrants live in a makeshift camp known as "The Jungle." Most are seeking to travel on to Britain, while some are seeking asylum in France. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Migrants queue to continue their journey north at a newly built registration and transit center near Gevgelija, Macedonia, on Sunday. More than 5,000 migrants crossed into Serbia on Sunday, resuming a journey to western Europe after an overwhelmed Macedonia gave up its attempts to stem the flow of mainly Syrian refugees by force. Ognen Teofilovski/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Ognen Teofilovski/Reuters/Landov

People wait for a train in the foreground as members of a police forensics team take part in an investigation next to a Thalys train on the platform at Arras train station, northern France on Saturday. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

Members of the Syrian band Khebez Dawle include (from left to right) Hekmat Qassar on guitar and keyboards, lead guitarist Bashar Darwish, bassist Muhammad Bazz and lead singer Anas Maghrebi. Half the band members are now in Turkey, and are strongly considering seeking asylum in Europe. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Syrian Rockers, Fleeing War, Find Safety And New Fans In Beirut

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Lucie Morillon, head of research at French watchdog of Reporters Sans Frontieres (Reporters without Borders) holds a banner depicting Syrian human rights activist Mazen Darwish during a protest against violence in Syria, in Paris, Saturday, Oct. 20, 2012. Darwish was released from a Syrian prison Monday. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Francois Mori/AP

Kurdish rebels in northern Syria walk near the devastated town of Kobani last November. The U.S. bombing campaign helped the Kurds push back the Islamic State from the area. But overall, the U.S. operation against ISIS in Iraq and Syria has shown only limited gains in the past year. Jake Simkin/AP hide caption

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Jake Simkin/AP

After A Year Of Bombing ISIS, U.S. Campaign Shows Just Limited Gains

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A fighter with Jabhat al-Nusra, the al-Qaida affiliate in Syria, takes down a picture of Syria's President Bashar Assad in the northwestern city of Ariha in May. Jabhat al-Nusra is strong in this area, and recently captured Syrian fighters trained by the U.S. Ammar Abdullah/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Ammar Abdullah/Reuters/Landov

Trained By U.S., Syrian Fighters Stumble As They Hit The Battlefield

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Flags of member nations wave outside NATO headquarters in Brussels. For just the fifth time in its 66-year history, NATO ambassadors met in an emergency, Article 4 session to gauge the threat that the so-called Islamic State poses to Turkey. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

Syrian President Bashar Assad speaks during his meeting with the heads and members of public organizations and professional associations in Damascus, on Sunday. Assad acknowledged that the fight against rebels had suffered setbacks, but vowed to win against insurgents. SANA/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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SANA/Reuters/Landov

Civil defense workers wear gas masks near damaged ground in a village near the Syrian city of Idlib in May. Activists said there had been a chlorine attack. Abed Kontar/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Abed Kontar/Reuters/Landov

In Syria, Chlorine Attacks Continue To Take A Toll

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A U.S. Air Force plane takes off as a Turkish air force fighter jet taxis at the Incirlik airbase, southern Turkey, in 2013. Reversing an earlier policy, Ankara has agreed to allow the U.S.-led coalition to fly anti-ISIS airstrikes from the base. Vadim Ghirda/AP hide caption

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Vadim Ghirda/AP

"What we are doing now has nothing to do with what we expected to be doing," says Rami Jarrah, who protested against the Assad regime in Damascus in 2011 and now runs a radio station from southern Turkey that broadcasts to civilians in rebel-controlled territory in northern Syria. Alison Meuse/NPR hide caption

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Alison Meuse/NPR

As Challenges Shift, Syria's Moderates Navigate Unexpected Territory

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Saeed al-Batal, a Syrian photographer, posted this image from Douma, Syria, on his Facebook page on March 31. Courtesy of Saeed al-Batal hide caption

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Courtesy of Saeed al-Batal

The View From Inside Syria

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