Colombia Colombia

A Spanish galleon is seen here in an artist's depiction of trade on the high seas in the 16th century. Colombia says it's found a galleon from 1708 that is believed to hold billions of dollars' worth of treasure. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

After the funeral in 2013 for popular folk music star Diomedes Diaz, fellow musicians including accordionist Andres Gil performed in homage to him. Now Colombia's Congress is considering a bill to honor Diaz. Ricardo Mazalan/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Mazalan/AP

Will Colombia Honor A Beloved Musician Who Was Also A Convicted Killer?

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A tattoo artist works in London in 2014. This September, a Colombian organization is offering to edit erroneous tattoos — free — and hopefully interest young people in the value of good grammar and spelling. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/Getty Images

This is one of 12 rain forest landscapes by Abel Rodriguez, part of his ink-and-watercolor series Ciclo anual del bosque de la vega (Seasonal changes in the flooded rain forest). Abel Rodriguez/Courtesy of Tropenbos International, Colombia hide caption

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Abel Rodriguez/Courtesy of Tropenbos International, Colombia

Fibers from the fique plant, dyed with natural pigments by artist Susana Mejia, are part of the Waterweavers exhibit. In the photo above, the fibers hang to dry in the Amazon jungle. Jorge Montoya hide caption

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Jorge Montoya

Colombia's Nairo Quintana, wearing the best young rider's white jersey,crosses the finish line of the 19th stage of the 2015 Tour de France on Friday. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

The Cycling World May Soon Bow Down Before Nairo Quintana

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A plane sprays coca fields in San Miguel, Colombia, in 2006. The Colombian government announced this week that it is phasing out the U.S.-backed aerial coca-eradication program over health concerns. William Fernando Martinez/AP hide caption

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William Fernando Martinez/AP

Colombia Will End Coca Crop-Dusting, Citing Health Concerns

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A Colombian soldier searches for land mines laid by rebel fighters. RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images

The Second Most Dangerous Country For Land Mines Begins To De-Mine

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A man carries a bag with coca leaves in December 2013 in a rural area of Corinto, department of Cauca, Colombia. The Colombian government and the FARC are attempting address the issue of "illicit cultivation" as the third point of their ongoing peace talks. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

As the mayor of Cali, Colombia, epidemiologist Rodrigo Guerrero (left) meets with the police once a week to review murder statistics. Courtesy of Prensa Alcaldía de Calí hide caption

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Courtesy of Prensa Alcaldía de Calí