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Gusmary Añez sits in a tent with two of her children. She and her husband, along with their four children, had been sleeping outdoors in Maicao, a Colombian town near the Venezuelan border. Now they live in one of 60 tents at the camp that house more than 300 Venezuelans. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

Venezuelans Find Temporary Lifeline At Colombia's First Border Tent Camp

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The Salt Cathedral of Zipaquirá is an underground church built inside a salt mine, and made entirely of salt. Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

Colombia's Salt Cathedral Is A Marvel Of Architecture And A Popular House Of Worship

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Ariel Ramos, 50, is tearing out coca leaves to be processed into coca paste, a substance that can be smoked or used for making cocaine powder. "I don't need to move to sell coca paste, the buyers come to me. It is easier than planting anything else." Fabiola Ferrero hide caption

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Fabiola Ferrero

Caminantes walk back toward Venezuela on the road between Bogotá and Socorro, Colombia. Thousands cross the border each day. Many head back to their home country after failing to find work or shelter. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Chronicles Of A Venezuelan Exodus: More Families Flee The Crisis On Foot Every Day

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Young men carry luggage from Venezuela into Colombia under the Simón Bolívar International Bridge. Tensions are rising in this border area, where many Venezuelans are seeking refuge and are anxious for change back home. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'Time To Act': Venezuelans Who Fled To Colombia Are Eager To Oust Maduro

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Colombian police escort a Venezuelan soldier into Cúcuta, Colombia. The soldier surrendered at a bridge crossing the Venezuela-Colombia border, where people tried to carry humanitarian aid into Venezuela on Feb. 23. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

1,000 Venezuelan Armed Forces Have Fled Across Border, Says Colombian Government

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A volunteer carries a bag with U.S. humanitarian aid goods in Cúcuta, Colombia, along the border with Venezuela, on Feb. 8. Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Masses Aid Along Venezuelan Border As Some Humanitarian Groups Warn Of Risks

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Fishermen wait to help people going to Colombia across the Arauca River near San Fernando de Apure in Venezuela in February 2017. More than 1 million Venezuelans are estimated to be living in Colombia. Juancho Torres/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Juancho Torres/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Fleeing Crisis, Some Venezuelans Are Recruited By Rebel Forces Fighting In Colombia

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José Palacios, a cacao farmer, holds the Late Chocó chocolate products produced by his son, Joel, in Bogotá. The package bears an illustration of his likeness. José Palacios lives in Colombia's western Chocó department, which is also a coca-growing region. Verónica Zaragovia for NPR hide caption

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Verónica Zaragovia for NPR

The USNS Comfort, a U.S. Navy medical ship, floats off the coast of Riohacha, Colombia. The medical vessel is on a four-country tour of the region, providing medical assistance. Jim Wyss/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Wyss/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

U.S. Navy Sends Hospital Ship To Colombia To Treat Venezuelan Migrants

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A farmer picks coca leaves in a field in Colombia. Joaquin Sarmiento/Getty Images hide caption

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Joaquin Sarmiento/Getty Images

Colombia Tries To Get Farmers Away From The Cocaine Biz. How's That Going?

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Colombian sculptor Doris Salcedo (center) cleans a spill on the floor during the pre-inauguration of her peace monument titled Fragmentos (Fragments), for which she used metal melted-down from the weapons handed over by FARC guerrilla fighters to make the floor, in Bogotá on July 31. Diana Sanchez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Diana Sanchez/AFP/Getty Images

A farmer shows cocaine base paste, made from coca leaves in Colombia's Guaviare department in 2017. Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images

Colombia Is Growing Record Amounts Of Coca, The Key Ingredient In Cocaine

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Residents of the Brazilian border town of Pacaraima burn tires and belongings of Venezuelan immigrants, after an attack on their makeshift camps. Isac Dantes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Isac Dantes/AFP/Getty Images