Colombia Colombia

Colombia's Nairo Quintana, wearing the best young rider's white jersey,crosses the finish line of the 19th stage of the 2015 Tour de France on Friday. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

The Cycling World May Soon Bow Down Before Nairo Quintana

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A plane sprays coca fields in San Miguel, Colombia, in 2006. The Colombian government announced this week that it is phasing out the U.S.-backed aerial coca-eradication program over health concerns. William Fernando Martinez/AP hide caption

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William Fernando Martinez/AP

Colombia Will End Coca Crop-Dusting, Citing Health Concerns

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A Colombian soldier searches for land mines laid by rebel fighters. RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images

The Second Most Dangerous Country For Land Mines Begins To De-Mine

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A man carries a bag with coca leaves in December 2013 in a rural area of Corinto, department of Cauca, Colombia. The Colombian government and the FARC are attempting address the issue of "illicit cultivation" as the third point of their ongoing peace talks. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

As the mayor of Cali, Colombia, epidemiologist Rodrigo Guerrero (left) meets with the police once a week to review murder statistics. Courtesy of Prensa Alcaldía de Calí hide caption

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Courtesy of Prensa Alcaldía de Calí

Clara Rojas waves as she arrives at an airport near Caracas, Venezuela, on Jan. 10, 2008, after being released from six years of captivity by Colombian rebels. Gregorio Marrero/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Marrero/AP

The Colombian Politician With An Incredible Back Story

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Colombian army soldiers patrol the Loma de Cristo—bal neighborhood after warring gangs forced dozens of families to flee. Medellin used to be the most dangerous city in the world but officials embarked on innovative projects designed to make life better in tough neighborhoods. Paul Smith for NPR hide caption

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Paul Smith for NPR

Once Home To A Dreaded Drug Lord, Medellin Remakes Itself

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