Venezuela Venezuela

Venezuela's President Nicolás Maduro greets supporters during a closing campaign rally in Caracas, Venezuela, Thursday. Maduro is seeking a new six-year mandate. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

Venezuela Holds Presidential Election But Main Opposition Is Boycotting It

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Laurie Holt holds a photograph of her son, Joshua Holt, at her home, in Riverton, Utah. Holt, who has been held in a Venezuelan jail for two years, uploaded a video plea for his released to Facebook this week. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Venezuelan opposition presidential candidate Henri Falcón addresses reporters in Caracas on May 8. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Meet The Popular Venezuelan Candidate With The Best Chance Of Taking On Maduro

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The lunch and helmet of a Venezuelan iron worker lie on a table during lunch break, in Ciudad Piar, Bolívar state, Venezuela. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

Many Venezuelan Workers Are Leaving The Job, And The Country

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A banner depicting Venezuela's currency, the bolivar, at the central bank of Venezuela in Caracas in January. The bolivar has lost the vast majority of its value in just the last year. Federico Parra /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra /AFP/Getty Images

A crowd waits to cross the border into Colombia over the Simón Bolívar bridge in San Antonio del Táchira, Venezuela, in July 2016. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

Venezuela's Deepening Crisis Triggers Mass Migration Into Colombia

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Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro addresses a news conference at the Miraflores Presidential Palace in Caracas last week. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

A volunteer from the non-profit Accion Solidaria organizes imported medicines alphabetically, in a store room in Caracas, Venezuela, last April. The Pharmaceutical Federation of Venezuela estimates the country is suffering from an 85 percent shortage of medicine. Fidel Suarez/AP hide caption

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Fidel Suarez/AP

Venezuelan Bolivarian National Guards officers control shoppers as they line up outside a supermarket to buy food at discounted prices in Caracas on Jan. 6. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Defendants Efrain Antonio Campos Flores (center left) and Franqui Francisco Flores de Freitas (center right), as depicted in federal court in New York on Thursday, were sentenced to 18 years in prison on drug conspiracy charges. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

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Elizabeth Williams/AP

Faced with rocketing inflation and low oil prices, Venezuela has introduced new, larger banknotes this year. Now the country is planning a cryptocurrency tied to its oil reserves. Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images

A woman walks past an oil pump in Caracas earlier this month. Part of Venezuela's fiscal woes arises from lowered gas prices worldwide — a huge hit to an economy so reliant on its oil production. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Entrepreneurs sort cocoa beans on a tray at Cacao de Origen, a school founded by Maria Di Giacobbe to train Venezuelan women in the making of premium chocolate. Zeina Alvarado (left) later found work in a bean-to-bar production facility in Mexico. Courtesy of Cacao de Origen hide caption

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Courtesy of Cacao de Origen

In an effort to combat chronic food shortages, President Nicolas Maduro and his ministers are embarking on a campaign to convince Venezuelans to eat rabbits. GK Hart/Vikki Hart/The Image Bank/Getty Images hide caption

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GK Hart/Vikki Hart/The Image Bank/Getty Images