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Opposition leader Juan Guaidó talks to the press as he holds his daughter, Miranda, next to his wife, Fabiana Rosales, outside his home in Caracas on Thursday. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (right) and National Security Adviser John Bolton announce sanctions against Venezuela, which are meant to put pressure on Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Venezuela's congressional leader, Juan Guaidó, is being recognized by a rising number of countries, including the U.S., as the South American country's interim president. Here, Guaidó (center) speaks to a crowd of opposition supporters at Bolívar Square, in eastern Caracas, last Friday. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Venezuela's top prosecutor, Tarek William Saab, talks to reporters in Caracas on Tuesday. He announced that Juan Guaidó, now President Nicolás Maduro's most prominent opponent, is barred from leaving the country because of an investigation. Marco Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Bello/Getty Images

Venezuela's National Assembly head Juan Guaidó waves during a mass opposition rally, during which he declared himself the country's acting president on Jan. 23. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Who Is Venezuela's Juan Guaidó?

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An attendee wears a Venezuelan flag during a rally in Caracas Friday with Juan Guaido, president of the National Assembly, who swore himself in as the leader of Venezuela. Marcelo Perez del Carpio/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcelo Perez del Carpio/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Amid Chaos, Venezuelans Struggle To Find The Truth, Online

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Russian President Vladimir Putin shakes hands with Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro during a meeting outside Moscow on Dec. 5. Maxim Shemetov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maxim Shemetov/AFP/Getty Images

Kremlin Rallies To Defend Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro

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Defense Minister Vladimir Padrino López delivers a message of support for Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro in Caracas, Venezuela, on Thursday. A half-dozen generals belonging largely to district commands and with direct control over thousands of troops joined Maduro in accusing the United States of meddling in Venezuela's affairs and said they would uphold the socialist leader's rule. Venezuelan Defense Ministry press office via AP hide caption

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Venezuelan Defense Ministry press office via AP

Why Venezuela's Military May Be Standing By Maduro, For Now

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Venezuela's sitting president, Nicolás Maduro, attends a ceremony Thursday in Caracas to mark the opening of the judicial year at the Supreme Court of Justice. Opposition leader Juan Guaidó has declared himself the interim president, but Maduro has not ceded power. Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters hide caption

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Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters

Juan Guaidó, head of Venezuela's opposition-run congress, declares himself interim president of Venezuela during a rally against President Nicolás Maduro in the capital, Caracas, on Wednesday. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Fishermen wait to help people going to Colombia across the Arauca River near San Fernando de Apure in Venezuela in February 2017. More than 1 million Venezuelans are estimated to be living in Colombia. Juancho Torres/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Juancho Torres/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Fleeing Crisis, Some Venezuelans Are Recruited By Rebel Forces Fighting In Colombia

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A resident at the Mother Teresa of Calcutta senior home in Caracas. The people at the home were not reluctant to be photographed, says photojournalist Wil Riera: "They want to share their history, to have a voice." Wil Riera hide caption

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Wil Riera

Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro takes the oath of office in Caracas, Venezuela, on Thursday. Maduro starts his second term amid international denunciation of his victory and a devastating economic crisis. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP