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Demonstrators throw stones at a line of Venezuelan National Guard troops along Venezuela's border with Brazil, at the Brazilian city of Pacaraima on Sunday. Ricardo Moraes/Reuters hide caption

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Ricardo Moraes/Reuters

In this photo released by Colombia's presidential press office, Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido makes a statement as Colombian Foreign Minister Carlos Holmes Trujillo stands by at a military airport on Sunday. Efrain Herrera/AP hide caption

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Efrain Herrera/AP

U.S. soldiers direct traffic outside the residence of the Peruvian ambassador to Panama, right rear, in Panama City on Jan. 9, 1990. In December 1989, U.S. President George H.W. Bush sent thousands of troops to Panama to arrest the country's leader, Manuel Noriega. John Gaps/AP hide caption

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John Gaps/AP

Trump's Venezuela Moves Follow Long History Of Intervention In Latin America

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A volunteer carries a bag with U.S. humanitarian aid goods in Cúcuta, Colombia, along the border with Venezuela, on Feb. 8. Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Masses Aid Along Venezuelan Border As Some Humanitarian Groups Warn Of Risks

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HIV-positive patients and their families protest hospitals' lack of medicines and supplies in Caracas, Venezuela, in April 2018. Some patients are fleeing to neighboring countries like Peru in search of lifesaving anti-retroviral drugs. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

The Tienditas bridge connecting Colombia and Venezuela has been blocked by Venezuelan military forces, as seen here on Wednesday. Opposition leader Juan Guaidó and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo are demanding that humanitarian aid be allowed to enter. Edinson Estupinan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Edinson Estupinan/AFP/Getty Images

Venezuelans wait in line for food in northern Brazil in February 2018. The migrants often say the main reasons they've fled are to get food and health care. Andre Coelho/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andre Coelho/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Collapse Of Health System Sends Venezuelans Fleeing To Brazil For Basic Meds

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An anti-government protester on Saturday in Caracas wears a sign that reads, "Venezuelans die for lack of medicines. Maduro is an assassin." Momentum is growing for opposition leader Juan Guaidó, who has called supporters into the streets. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

Opposition leader Juan Guaidó talks to the press as he holds his daughter, Miranda, next to his wife, Fabiana Rosales, outside his home in Caracas on Thursday. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (right) and National Security Adviser John Bolton announce sanctions against Venezuela, which are meant to put pressure on Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Venezuela's congressional leader, Juan Guaidó, is being recognized by a rising number of countries, including the U.S., as the South American country's interim president. Here, Guaidó (center) speaks to a crowd of opposition supporters at Bolívar Square, in eastern Caracas, last Friday. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images