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Venezuela

Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido stands under the national flag during a gathering with supporters after members of the Bolivarian National Guard joined his campaign to oust President Nicolas Maduro, in Caracas on April 30. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Things in Venezuela are so bad that patients who are hospitalized must bring not only their own food but also medical supplies like syringes and scalpels as well as their own soap and water, a new report says. Barcroft Media/Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media/Getty Images

Caminantes walk back toward Venezuela on the road between Bogotá and Socorro, Colombia. Thousands cross the border each day. Many head back to their home country after failing to find work or shelter. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Chronicles Of A Venezuelan Exodus: More Families Flee The Crisis On Foot Every Day

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Venezuela's power grid crashed on March 7, 2019, throwing almost all of the oil-rich nation's 30 million residents into chaos for nearly a week. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

'New York Times' Journalist Describes An 'Almost Unimaginable' Crisis In Venezuela

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A worker at VKE Cargo in Miami prepares a pallet containing cargo to be shipped to Venezuela. Fewer shipping companies are willing and able to ship to Venezuela. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

A Shortage Of Shippers For Badly Needed Supplies Of Food And Medicine To Venezuela

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A woman holds a placard reading "We Want Water and Electricity" as she shouts slogans during a protest in Caracas, Venezuela, about a lack of water and electric service during a new power outage in the country on Sunday. President Nicolás Maduro announced a 30-day electricity rationing plan to help as the government works to restore service. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Young men carry luggage from Venezuela into Colombia under the Simón Bolívar International Bridge. Tensions are rising in this border area, where many Venezuelans are seeking refuge and are anxious for change back home. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'Time To Act': Venezuelans Who Fled To Colombia Are Eager To Oust Maduro

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Colombian police escort a Venezuelan soldier into Cúcuta, Colombia. The soldier surrendered at a bridge crossing the Venezuela-Colombia border, where people tried to carry humanitarian aid into Venezuela on Feb. 23. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

1,000 Venezuelan Armed Forces Have Fled Across Border, Says Colombian Government

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A damaged door frame is seen at the home of Roberto Marrero in Caracas on Thursday. Opposition leader Juan Guaidó says his chief of staff was detained by Venezuelan intelligence agents. Ivan Alvarado/Reuters hide caption

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Ivan Alvarado/Reuters

U.S. diplomats began the exodus from the Caracas, Venezuela, embassy earlier this week. On Thursday, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo confirmed the last remaining American diplomats have left the country. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

A U.S. flag flies outside the U.S. Embassy in Caracas, Venezuela, in January. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that all remaining embassy personnel would be withdrawn this week. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP