African Americans African Americans

Pope Francis reaches out to 5th grader Omodele Ojo of East New York, Brooklyn during his arrival at John F. Kennedy International Airport on Thursday. Craig Ruttle/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/Pool/Getty Images

Pope Francis Inspires Black Catholics, Despite Complicated Church History On Race

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African-American evangelical leaders visited a Jerusalem crafts workshop for elderly Israelis, a project supported by the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews. The group and Israel's tourism ministry sponsored the pastors' trip to Israel, part of the Fellowship's new outreach effort to African-American congregations. Courtesy of IFCJ hide caption

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Courtesy of IFCJ

Israel Courts African-American Evangelicals, Despite Some Hurdles

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People interlock hands on the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge in Charleston, S.C., a few days after nine black churchgoers were killed by a white shooter in June. A new PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds attitudes about opportunities in the U.S. for blacks and whites contrast along racial lines. The poll will be discussed during PBS' America After Charleston broadcast Monday night. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Stephen Van Cleef, a fictional Seneca Village resident played by Billy Eugene Jones (left), meets a New York City police officer, played by Andy Truschinski, in The People Before the Park at Premiere Stages at Kean University in Union, N.J. Mike Peters/Premiere Stages hide caption

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Mike Peters/Premiere Stages

Lives Displaced By Central Park Take Center Stage In New Play

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A crowd watches after a South Carolina honor guard lowers the Confederate flag from the Statehouse grounds on July 10, 2015 in Columbia, S.C. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Confederate Flag Comes Down: A Tonic For The American Soul

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Members of the clergy wait to enter the funeral service of Rev. Clementa Pinckney. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Charleston's Black Leaders Want To See Justice As Much As Forgiveness

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Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton speaks with Frederic Hunt, a minister at First Calvary Baptist Church, during a campaign stop Wednesday at The Main Street Bakery in Columbia, S.C. Richard Shiro/AP hide caption

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Richard Shiro/AP

Are Black Voters Ready For Hillary Clinton?

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Alain Locke is buried at the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. He lies near many of the nation's early congressmen and next to the first director of the Smithsonian's Museum of African Art. Adam Cole/NPR hide caption

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Adam Cole/NPR

Alain Locke, Whose Ashes Were Found In University Archives, Is Buried

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Disease susceptibility varies among ethnic groups, but medicine hasn't always recognized that. Jo Unruh/iStockphoto hide caption

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Jo Unruh/iStockphoto

Mike Jackson has diabetes and high blood pressure. His eye was damaged after he cut back on insulin because he couldn't afford it. Bryan Terry for NPR hide caption

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Bryan Terry for NPR

African-Americans Remain Hardest Hit By Medical Bills

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