African Americans African Americans

Phillip Thompson is a Gulf War veteran and a lawyer with his own practice. When he moved to his exclusive Leesburg, Va., enclave more than a decade ago, many of his mostly white neighbors assumed he had to be a professional athlete to afford his home. Brakkton Booker/NPR hide caption

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Brakkton Booker/NPR

Money May Not Shield Prosperous Blacks From Bigotry, Survey Says

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One of Twitty's projects is his "Southern Discomfort Tour" — a journey through the "forgotten little Africa" of the Old South. He picks cotton, chops wood, works in rice fields and cooks for audiences in plantation kitchens while dressed in slave clothing to recreate what his ancestors had to endure. Courtesy of Michael Twitty hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Twitty

New research finds that African-Americans who grow up in harsh environments and endure stressful experiences are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Leland Bobbe/Getty Images hide caption

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Leland Bobbe/Getty Images

Stress And Poverty May Explain High Rates Of Dementia In African-Americans

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A comprehensive study of air pollution in the U.S. finds it still kills thousands a year, and disproportionately affects poor people and minorities. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

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Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Edward Albee in 1965. Jack Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Mitchell/Getty Images

Who's Afraid Of A Diverse Cast?

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The perception of universal success among Asian-Americans is being wielded to downplay racism's role in the persistent struggles of other minority groups, especially black Americans. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Demonstrators protest United Airlines at O'Hare International Airport on April 11, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. The protest was in response to airport police officers physically removing passenger Dr. David Dao from his seat and dragging him off the airplane, after he was requested to give up his seat for United Airline crew members on a flight from Chicago to Louisville, Kentucky Sunday night. Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

Politics Of Respectability And A Dragged Passenger

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What remains of the home of O.T. Jackson, the founder of Dearfield, Colo., sits on the town site in rural Weld County. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

If Chicago, the fifth most racially and economically segregated city in the country, were to lower its level of segregation to the national median of the 100 largest metropolitan areas in the country, it would have a profound impact on the entire region. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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